The Effect of Five-Toed Socks on Postural Control Among Active Individuals Who Have Chronic Ankle Instabilities

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified September 2010 by University of Toledo Health Science Campus.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Toledo Health Science Campus
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01210612
First received: June 23, 2010
Last updated: December 15, 2010
Last verified: September 2010
  Purpose

Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is one of the most common injuries in sports. There is a unique style of socks that have become popular in Japan among athletes that could also improve postural control. The purpose of the study is to determine the effectiveness of five-toed socks on dynamic postural control in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.


Condition Intervention
Lateral Ankle Sprain
Device: five-toed socks

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: The Effect of Five-Toed Socks on Postural Control Among Active Individuals Who Have Chronic Ankle Instabilities

Further study details as provided by University of Toledo Health Science Campus:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Center of Pressure [ Time Frame: separate testing days, one week apart ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome measurement for this study will be to determine differences in Center of Pressure (COP) and static postural control patterns in individuals with and without CAI during the single limb balance test. Additionally, performance will be compared with eyes-open and eyes-closed.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • reaching distances [ Time Frame: separate testing days, one week apart ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The secondary outcome measurement for this study will be to determine differences in the mean value of the three reaching distances (the anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial direction) of the SEBT in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.


Estimated Enrollment: 30
Study Start Date: September 2010
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2010
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Without Unilateral CAI Device: five-toed socks
five-toed socks usage
Active Comparator: With Unilateral CAI Device: five-toed socks
five-toed socks usage

Detailed Description:

Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is one of the most common injuries in sports. Ankle braces and orthotic insoles also have been shown to influence the neuromuscular control system by enhancing the proprioceptive and cutaneous afferent inputs to the central nerve system; thereby improving postural control. There is a unique style of socks that have become popular in Japan among athletes that could also improve postural control by enhancing cutaneous afferent inputs from the plantar surface of the foot and toes. The purpose of the study is to determine the effectiveness of five-toed socks on dynamic postural control in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 30 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • member of university community
  • All subjects will be physically active (at least 30 minutes of sustained exercise 3 times/week

Exclusion Criteria:

  • history of: knee or hip musculoskeletal injury or surgery
  • history of: fracture or dislocation of the testing ankle or leg
  • neurological problems
  • vestibular disorders or concussions within the last 6 months
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01210612

Contacts
Contact: Junji Shinohara (716) 982-3137 Phillip.Gribble@UToledo.Edu

Locations
United States, Ohio
University of Toledo Recruiting
Toledo, Ohio, United States, 43614
Contact: Junji Shinohara    716-982-3137    Junji.Shinohara11@rockets.utoledo.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Toledo Health Science Campus
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Phillip Gribble University of Toledo
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Phillip Gribble, PhD, ATC, University of Toledo, HSC
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01210612     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: UTHSC-12
Study First Received: June 23, 2010
Last Updated: December 15, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Sprains and Strains
Ankle Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Leg Injuries

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 19, 2014