The Psychological Treatment of Overweight Binge Eaters Minority Supplement

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Washington University School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01208259
First received: August 31, 2010
Last updated: September 24, 2010
Last verified: September 2010
  Purpose

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has documented efficacy for the treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been shown to reduce binge eating but its long-term impact and time course on other BED-related symptoms remain largely unknown. This study compares the effects of group CBT and group IPT across BED-related symptoms among overweight individuals with BED.


Condition Intervention Phase
Binge Eating Disorder
Cognitive Therapy/Methods
Mental Disorders/Epidemiology
Obesity/Epidemiology
Obesity/Therapy
Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Behavioral: Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)
Phase 1
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Randomized Comparison of Group-Behavioral Therapy and Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Overweight Individuals With Binge-Eating Disorder Minority Supplement

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Washington University School of Medicine:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Short and long-term efficacy of two treatments for binge eating among the overweight: Group Cognitive-Behavior (CBT) and Group Interpersonal Therapy (IPT).
    Assessments of binge eating and associated eating disorder psychopathology, general psychological functioning, and weight occurred before treatment, at post treatment, and at 4-month intervals up to 12 months following treatment.


Enrollment: 162
Study Start Date: April 1997
Study Completion Date: March 1999
Primary Completion Date: March 1999 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Binge Eating Disorder/Therapy Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Behavioral: Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Detailed Description:

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has documented efficacy for the treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been shown to reduce binge eating but its long-term impact and time course on other BED-related symptoms remain largely unknown. This study compares the effects of group CBT and group IPT across BED-related symptoms among overweight individuals with BED. METHODS: One hundred sixty-two overweight patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for BED were randomly assigned to 20 weekly sessions of either group CBT or group IPT. Assessments of binge eating and associated eating disorder psychopathology, general psychological functioning, and weight occurred before treatment, at posttreatment, and at 4-month intervals up to 12 months following treatment. RESULTS: Binge-eating recovery rates were equivalent for CBT and IPT at posttreatment (64 [79%] of 81 vs 59 [73%] of 81) and at 1-year follow-up (48 [59%] of 81 vs 50 [62%] of 81). Binge eating increased slightly through follow-up but remained significantly below pretreatment levels. Across treatments, patients had similar significant reductions in associated eating disorders and psychiatric symptoms and maintenance of gains through follow-up. Dietary restraint decreased more quickly in CBT but IPT had equivalent levels by later follow-ups. Patients' relative weight decreased significantly but only slightly, with the greatest reduction among patients sustaining recovery from binge eating from posttreatment to 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Group IPT is a viable alternative to group CBT for the treatment of overweight patients with BED. Although lacking a nonspecific control condition limits conclusions about treatment specificity, both treatments showed initial and long-term efficacy for the core and related symptoms of BED.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • DSM-IV research criteria for binge-eating disorder
  • Average of greater than or equal to 2 days of binge eating per week for at least 6 months' duration
  • Marked stress regarding binge eating
  • At least 3 to 5 associated behavioral features (e.g. eating when not physically hungry) Other study criteria
  • 18-65 years old
  • Body mass index, 27-48 kg/m squared

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnant or planning to become pregnant
  • Taking weight-affecting or psychotropic medications
  • Psychiatric conditions warranting immediate treatment
  • Current enrollment in psychotherapy or a weight loss program
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01208259

Locations
United States, Connecticut
Yale University
New Haven, Connecticut, United States, 06511-3516
Sponsors and Collaborators
Washington University School of Medicine
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Denise E Wilfley, Ph.D. Washington University Early Recognition Center
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Denise E. Wilfley, Ph.D., San Diego State University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01208259     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R29MH138403
Study First Received: August 31, 2010
Last Updated: September 24, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by Washington University School of Medicine:
Body Mass Index
Bulimia/therapy
Comorbidity
Interpersonal Relations
Psychotherapy/methods

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Mental Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Bulimia
Binge-Eating Disorder
Eating Disorders
Obesity
Overweight
Schizophrenia and Disorders with Psychotic Features
Hyperphagia
Signs and Symptoms, Digestive
Signs and Symptoms
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Body Weight

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 20, 2014