Effect of Osteopathic Manipulation on Postural Stability in the Elderly

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of North Texas Health Science Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01153412
First received: June 28, 2010
Last updated: June 29, 2010
Last verified: June 2010
  Purpose

Postural stability and balance are defined as the body's ability to return the body back to its equilibrium point when exposed to a perturbation. This exploratory project is based on the hypotheses that decreased balance (increased sway as measured by the center of pressure of the body during quiet standing) causes an increased risk of falls and osteopathic manipulative treatment can improve postural balance. To test these hypotheses, the investigators will investigate the kinematics (study of the way the body moves) of postural balance in two cohorts of healthy elders, those receiving manipulation and those not receiving manipulation. We hypothesize that OMT is effective to increase postural stability, balance.


Condition Intervention
Balance Control in Elderly
Other: OMT Manipulation

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Effect of Osteopathic Manipulation on Postural Stability in the Elderly

Further study details as provided by University of North Texas Health Science Center:

Enrollment: 60
Study Start Date: August 2008
Study Completion Date: April 2010
Primary Completion Date: April 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intervention Details:
    Other: OMT Manipulation
    Osteopathic manipulation to determine balance and stability in elderly
Detailed Description:

Postural stability and balance are defined as the body's ability to return the body back to its equilibrium point when exposed to a perturbation. This exploratory project is based on the hypotheses that decreased balance(increased sway as measured by the center of pressure of the body during quiet standing) causes an increased risk of falls and osteopathic manipulative treatment can improve postural balance. To test these ideas, the investigators will investigate the kinematics(study of the way the body moves)of postural balance in two cohorts of healthy elders, those receiving manipulation and those not receiving manipulation. We hypothesize that OMT is effective to increase postural stability, balance.

Specific Aims Aim 1: To measure balance in a cohort of healthy elders(age 65 and over)using a force plate to measure center of pressure in the Anterior/posterior and medial-lateral directions during quiet standing with the eyes open, with the eyes closed and during a Romberg test.

Aim 2: To evaluate the effectiveness of OMT to improve balance in a healthy elderly population. We will observe the progression of improvement in balance in one group who will receive OMT for four weeks compared to the other who will not receive OMT.

Aim 3: To examine any potential impact and efficacy of OMT on cardiac and circulatory responses by measuring blood flow and circulation.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   65 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 65 years ofage and older
  • Healthy
  • Male and Female

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Self report of a condition that could impair balance, such as otoneurologic, musculoskeletal or neurological diseases.
  • Under the age of 65
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01153412

Sponsors and Collaborators
University of North Texas Health Science Center
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Rita Patterson, PhD UNTHSC
  More Information

No publications provided by University of North Texas Health Science Center

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Rita M. Patterson, Ph.D., University of North Texas Health Science Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01153412     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2008-087
Study First Received: June 28, 2010
Last Updated: June 29, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2014