(Mis)Perceptions About Healthy Eating: Effects on Food Intake and Appetite in Men and Women (COLLATION)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec
Danone Institute International
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Véronique Provencher, Laval University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01141140
First received: June 9, 2010
Last updated: February 13, 2012
Last verified: February 2012
  Purpose

In the face of an increased prevalence of obesity and chronic diseases in Canada, much effort has been invested to educate the population about healthy eating. Although Canadians are now aware of the importance of healthier food habits, rates of obesity and chronic diseases are still increasing. In addition, even if different labelling strategies are used to identify healthier foods in the market, consumers remain confused about what healthy eating should be. Might describing foods as healthy have unintended side-effects on food intake? Previous literature has shown that perceptions about the healthiness of foods may bias estimations of caloric content of foods, leading consumers to underestimate the caloric content of "healthy" food choices. Indeed, the investigators have recently shown that perceiving a food as healthy increased intake of that food by 35% in undergraduate female students. The general objective of the proposed research is to investigate whether food perceptions influence intake and appetite sensations in normal-weight and overweight/obese restrained and unrestrained males and females. This laboratory study, in which perceived healthiness and "fatteningness" of oatmeal-raisin cookies will be manipulated during an ad libitum single-meal occasion, will increase the investigators knowledge of the effects of external cues (and other psychological and physiological factors) on the control of food intake. Because the popularity and demand for nutrition information is increasing, such information is needed to improve clinical practices aiming at promoting sustainable healthy eating habits to help individuals achieve and maintain a healthy weight.


Condition Intervention
Eating
Obesity
Behavioral: Healthy
Behavioral: Diet
Behavioral: Unhealthy

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Official Title: (Mis)Perceptions About Healthy Eating: Effects on Food Intake and Appetite in Men and Women

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Laval University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Single-meal intake [ Time Frame: 12-24-2010 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The amount of food eaten during the meal (grams and calories).


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Appetite sensations [ Time Frame: 12-24-2010 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Visual-analogue ratings of desire to eat, hunger, fullness, and prospective food consumption (measured in millimeters).


Enrollment: 355
Study Start Date: September 2009
Study Completion Date: December 2011
Primary Completion Date: December 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
M-NO-NR
Men (M) non-obese (NO) and non-restrained (NR).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.
M-NO-R
Men (M) non-obese (NO) and restrained (R).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.
M-O-NR
Men (M) overweight or obese (O) and non-restrained (NR).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.
M-O-R
Men (M) overweight or obese (O) and restrained (R).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.
W-NO-NR
Women (W) non-obese (NO) and non-restrained (NR).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.
W-NO-R
Women (W) non-obese (NO) and restrained (R).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.
W-O-NR
Women (W) overweight or obese (O) and non-restrained (NR).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.
W-O-R
Women (W) overweight or obese (O) and restrained (R).
Behavioral: Healthy
Favourable nutritional characteristics.
Behavioral: Diet
Benefits of an ingredient/nutrient for weight management
Behavioral: Unhealthy
Hedonic characteristics and less healthy ingredients.

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Stable weight (± 2.5 kg) for at least 2 months prior to the study.
  • Females will be tested in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle to control for potential impact of hormonal variation on appetite measurements and food intake.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • They will not be taking medication (e.g., corticosteroids, tricyclic antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics) and not present chronic health problems (e.g., eating disorders, diabetes, hyperthyroidism).
  • No pregnant women nor lactating women.
  • Aversion to the snack food used in the study.
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01141140

Locations
Canada, Quebec
Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functionnal Foods (INAF)
Québec city, Quebec, Canada, G1V 0A6
Sponsors and Collaborators
Laval University
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec
Danone Institute International
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Veronique Provencher, PhD Laval University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Véronique Provencher, Professeur sous octroi, Laval University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01141140     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: INAF 2009-117
Study First Received: June 9, 2010
Last Updated: February 13, 2012
Health Authority: Canada: Ethics Review Committee

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2014