Effect of Prolonged Military Exercises With High Load Carriage, on Neuromuscular Fatigue and Physiological/Biomechanical Responses

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01127191
First received: May 11, 2010
Last updated: July 24, 2012
Last verified: July 2012
  Purpose

Land military missions generally combine prolonged walking/moderate-pace-running and other physical actions such as creeping, jumping, shooting,… which are associated with the direct carrying of high to severe loads of equipment and supplies (20-30 to 50 kg) by soldiers. For an infantry section, "typical" intervention phases last about 20-24 h and combine variable intensity grades. Consequently, military mission characteristics are an interesting investigation field of human fatigue. Previous studies have investigated human neuromuscular alterations after prolonged "normal" locomotion exercises [Millet et al., 2004, 2009], thus the aim of this study is to characterize the neuromuscular determinants of fatigue induced by a 24-h Simulated Military Effort (SME) and a 4-h Military Road March (MM), both performed with high load carriage. Additionally, the consequences of fatigue on physiological and biomechanical parameters of locomotion will be investigated.


Condition Intervention
Healthy
Other: military equipment

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Central fatigue quantification based on voluntary and electrically-induced force measurement on activated muscle. [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Peripheral fatigue based on electrically-induced force measurement on the same muscle in relaxed condition. [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Oxygen uptake, carbon-dioxide output, energetic-cost of locomotion and respiratory ratio, based on subject's gas exchanges. [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Lactatemia, based on subject's arterialized capillary blood samples analysis [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Muscular electrical activities, based on subject's surface EMG analysis [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Heart rate frequence [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Walking and running mechanics, measured by an instrumented treadmill [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Postural equilibration, measured by a piezo-dynamometric double platform [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rate of perceived exertion, measured by the Borg scale ranging from 6 to 20 [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Perceived comfort, measured by a 10 cm visual analogic scale (VAS) [ Time Frame: after a a military exercise of 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Biospecimen Retention:   Samples Without DNA

Lactatemia, based on subject's arterialized capillary blood samples analysis.


Enrollment: 10
Study Start Date: March 2010
Study Completion Date: April 2010
Primary Completion Date: April 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
Military Other: military equipment
Military exercise of 24 hours

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   30 Years to 45 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

military retreated from national army

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • to be a male
  • to have a VO2max > 45ml/min/kg (mean observed value in military subjects)
  • to be aged from 30 to 45
  • to be recently retreated from National Army
  • to be highly experienced in military efforts
  • to be trained in exercises involving load carrying
  • to benefit from a social security insurance

Exclusion Criteria:

  • All subjects with recent (< 3 month) bone, articular or muscle diseases.
  • All subjects presenting a clinic sign of intolerance to testing procedures, especially subjects with knee, ankle, hip or back diseases.
  • All subjects intolerant to muddy or wooded environment.
  • All subjects presenting a clinic sign of intolerance to exercise, and particularly to running or walking while carrying a load
  • All subjects involved at the same time in another medical research
  • All subjects militarily active
  • All subjects with cardiac or pulmonary identified and known diseases
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01127191

Locations
France
CHU de Saint-Etienne
Saint-Etienne, France, 42055
Sponsors and Collaborators
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Roger OULLION, Dr CHU SAINT-ETIENNE
  More Information

No publications provided by Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01127191     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 0901110, 2009-A01346-51
Study First Received: May 11, 2010
Last Updated: July 24, 2012
Health Authority: France: Afssaps - Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des produits de santé (Saint-Denis)

Keywords provided by Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne:
military exercises
neuromuscular fatigue
physiological responses
biomechanical responses
simulated military effort
high load carriage
Healthy voluntary

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014