Efficacy Study of the Octapolar Lead in Patients With Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS) With Chronic Pain

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rik Buschman, PhD, Medtronic Neuromodulation Europe
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01096147
First received: March 8, 2010
Last updated: November 1, 2013
Last verified: November 2013
  Purpose

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for over 40 years to treat neuropathic pain. Various clinical studies have shown a beneficial effect of SCS on pain in patients with Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS). Since more than 2 years the 8-contact points Octad lead has been used and replaced the 4-contact points Quad lead. Even though it seems that eight electrodes has potential advantage over the four electrodes in case of lead migration or disease progress, no clinical data have been published on the effectiveness of SCS using the octopolar epidural lead. The Octad study intents to assess the effectiveness and technical performance of SCS with the Octad® lead for treatment of chronic pain. This study is not set up as a comparison study between the Octad lead and other SCS leads, such as the Quad lead, because the Octad lead is used in most eligible FBSS patients as the standard of care lead.

The study intends to:

  1. evaluate the effectiveness of SCS with the Octad® lead on chronic pain in Failed Back Surgery Syndrome patients after 12 months of treatment.
  2. collect safety data for SCS with the Octad® lead in patients with refractory chronic pain.

Condition Intervention Phase
Failed Back Surgery Syndrome
Device: Spinal cord stimulation with eight polar electrode
Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Octad Study: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Octopolar Lead in Patients With Failed Back Surgery Syndrome With Low Back and/or Leg Pain During a One Year Follow-up Period

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Medtronic Neuromodulation Europe:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Pain suppression in low back and/or leg [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Evaluate the evolution of pain control with the octopolar Octad® lead assessed by a decrease in VAS for leg (and low-back pain separately, if applicable) during 12 months follow-up. Actual pain, the least pain during the last week and the worst pain during the last week are scored.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • adverse events related to SCS [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Clinical (such as surgery related infections) and technical (such as lead fractures) adverse events will be collected continuously in all patients during a period of 12 months post implant.

  • quality of life [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Quality of life assessed by EuroQol group - 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D)

  • sleep [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Sleep is assessed by a 3 item questionnaire on sleep quality, falling asleep and waking up from pain.

  • pain medication intake [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Data will be collected at specific times on health service resourse use of concomitant pain medication such as opioids.

  • Healthcare resource utilization [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Data will be collected at specific times on health service resourse use of concomitant non-drug therapy use, such as physiotherapy, related to FBSS.

  • preferred stimulation settings [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Characterization of pulsegenerator parameters, such as amplitude, pulse width, stimulation frequency, electrode configuration (positive and negative poles), number of stimulation programs, and stimulation duration is done at specific times.


Enrollment: 80
Study Start Date: February 2010
Study Completion Date: November 2013
Primary Completion Date: March 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: SCS
patients receiving SCS for chronic leg and/or back pain.
Device: Spinal cord stimulation with eight polar electrode
In SCS a lead is positioned in the epidural space on the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord as to produce electrically induced paraesthesia in the painful area.
Other Name: Spinal column stimulation

Detailed Description:

The use of Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) for pain control has already a history of more than 40 years. In SCS, a lead is positioned in the epidural space on the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord so as to produce stimulation induced paraesthesia in the painful area. During the last decades many articles have been published, clearly indicating the effectiveness and safety of SCS with quadripolar leads in the pain management of chronic neuropathic pain, and in particular Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS). Randomized controlled trials demonstrated that compared with re-operation, SCS provides effective pain relief for at least 3 years and compared with conventional non-surgical neuropathic pain management for at least 2 years.

However, SCS-related complications can occur, that can be divided into surgical complications and hardware complications. The hardware technology has substantially improved over the years. Moreover, electrodes have become smaller in shape and easier to navigate through the epidural space; and finally, internal pulse generators have new programming capabilities and a longer battery life span. All these technological developments led to the application of minimally invasive percutaneous stimulation trials for a variety of patients with chronic neuropathic pain. Turner et al performed a meta-analysis of spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome publications and reported hardware complications of 24% lead migration, 7% lead failure and 2% pulse generator failure. While this analysis evaluated studies using older hardware systems, there is first evidence that the rate of these complications is lower currently with new systems. In the recently published PROCESS paper, also using quadripolar electrodes, long term follow-up showed that hardware complications were 14%: lead migration, 3% lead failure and no pulse generator failures.

Generally, patients with radicular pain to the lower extremities respond better to spinal cord stimulation than patients with isolated axial low back pain. However, a few studies have shown that axial low back pain in combination with bilateral leg pain, also respond well to spinal cord stimulation. Both four (e.g. quadripolar Quad lead) and eight (e.g. octapolar Octad® lead) electrodes were shown to be effective in treatment of low back and lower extremity pain, with no apparent advantage of one system over the other. In the recent PROCESS study publication, the reduction of SCS on low-back pain was not-statistically significant when compared to baseline. Even though it seems that eight electrodes may have the potential advantage in case of lead migration or disease progress, no clinical data have been published on the effectiveness of SCS using the octopolar epidural lead. The Octad study is a prospective, multi-center, open-label, non-randomized, interventional study designed to assess the effectiveness and technical performance of SCS with the Octad® lead for treatment of chronic pain. This study is not set up as a comparison study between the Octad lead and other SCS leads, such as the Quad lead, because the Octad lead is used in most eligible FBSS patients as the standard of care lead.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. FBSS patients with neuropathic pain in low-back and/or legs who have not reached their therapy goal with other treatment interventions
  2. ≥ 18 years of age
  3. Chronic pain as a result of FBSS that exists for at least 6 months
  4. Mean pain intensity in the legs should be 5 or higher measured on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS).
  5. Patient has been informed of the study procedures and has given written informed consent.
  6. Patient willing to comply with study protocol including attending the study visits.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Expected inability of patients to receive or properly operate the spinal cord stimulation system
  2. History of coagulation disorders, lupus erythematosus, diabetic neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis or morbus Bechterew
  3. Active malignancy
  4. Addiction to any of the following: drugs, alcohol (5E/day) and/or medication
  5. Evidence of an active disruptive psychiatric disorder or other known condition significant enough to impact perception of pain, compliance to intervention and/or ability to evaluate treatment outcome as determined by investigator
  6. Immune deficiency (HIV positive, immunosuppressive, etc.)
  7. Life expectancy < 1 year
  8. Local infection or other skin disorder at site of incision
  9. Pregnancy
  10. Other implanted active medical device
  11. Participation in another clinical trial.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01096147

Locations
Belgium
Hospital ZNA Middelheim
Antwerpen, Belgium, 2020
Hospital St Jan
Brugge, Belgium, 8000
Hospital Alma Eeklo
Eeklo, Belgium, 9900
University Hospital Gent
Gent, Belgium, 9000
Hospital Nicolaas
Sint-Niklaas, Belgium, 9100
St Elisabeth
Zottegem, Belgium, 9620
Norway
Stavanger University Hospital
Stavanger, Norway, 4068
Sweden
Shalgrenska Hospital
Gothenburg, Sweden, 41345
Sponsors and Collaborators
Rik Buschman, PhD
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ann Ver Donck, MD PhD Hospital St Jan, Brugge, Belgium
Principal Investigator: Kliment P Gatzinsky, MD PhD Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
Principal Investigator: Roald Baardsen, MD PhD University hospital Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Rik Buschman, PhD, Principal Scientist, Medtronic Neuromodulation Europe
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01096147     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Octad study
Study First Received: March 8, 2010
Last Updated: November 1, 2013
Health Authority: Belgium: Institutional Review Board
Norway: Ethics Committee
Sweden: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Medtronic Neuromodulation Europe:
FBSS
chronic pain
leg pain
low back pain
spinal cord stimulation

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Chronic Pain
Failed Back Surgery Syndrome
Pain
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Back Pain
Postoperative Complications
Pathologic Processes

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 21, 2014