Comparison of Critical Flicker Fusion Versus Automated Visual Fields in the Detection of Early Glaucoma

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Nassau University Medical Center
Information provided by:
North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01076114
First received: February 24, 2010
Last updated: March 14, 2011
Last verified: March 2011
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate if critical flicker fusion is a more reliable method for detection of early glaucoma compared to automated visual fields in comparison to subjects without evidence of glaucoma or optic nerve disease.


Condition
Glaucoma

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Comparison of Critical Flicker Fusion vs. Automated Visual Fields in the Detection of Early Glaucoma

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Difference of mean deviation of glaucoma suspects from controls between critical flicker fusion and automated visual fields. [ Time Frame: 1 visit (1 day) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 58
Study Start Date: February 2010
Study Completion Date: February 2011
Primary Completion Date: February 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
Control
Patients with no evidence of glaucoma or as a suspect with normal intraocular pressure, normal cup to disc ratio with no other ocular pathology and a normal ophthalmic exam.
Glaucoma Suspect
Patients with abnormal cup to disc ratio or increased intraocular pressure (>21mm/Hg) with an otherwise normal ophthalmic exam.

Detailed Description:

Our hypothesis is that critical flicker fusion (CFF) is a more reliable method for detection of early glaucoma compared to automated visual fields in comparison to subjects without evidence of glaucoma or optic nerve disease. We aim to evaluate the structure of the optic nerve and compare it to results of visual fields and CFF. The CFF will also be correlated with intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements to observe if it may be more closely related than visual fields. This may become an additional tool to detect glaucoma in those with unreliable visual fields or who are unable to perform a visual field from physical or mental limitations.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

Subjects will be selected from routine clinic patients seen at the Eye Center at Nassau University Medical Center, in East Meadow, NY.

Criteria

Inclusion:

  • Glaucoma Suspects:
  • Abnormal optic disc appearance with increased cup to disc ratio, or
  • Increased intraocular pressure >21 in either eye
  • Control Subjects:
  • Normal appearing optic discs
  • Normal intraocular pressure (<21)

Exclusion:

  • Other ocular pathology
  • History of seizures or epilepsy
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01076114

Locations
United States, New York
Nassau University Medical Center
East Meadow, New York, United States, 11554
Sponsors and Collaborators
North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System
Nassau University Medical Center
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Colin Scott, MD Nassau University Medical Center
  More Information

Publications:

Responsible Party: Colin Scott, MD, Nassau University Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01076114     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 09-320
Study First Received: February 24, 2010
Last Updated: March 14, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Glaucoma
Ocular Hypertension
Eye Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 23, 2014