Evaluation of Impacts of Health Education for Children of Microcredit Clients in Peru

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
American Medical Women's Association
University of California, Berkeley
Center for Latin American Studies at UCB
University of California, San Francisco
Interdisciplinary MPH Program at the UCB School of Public Health
Rainer Fund
Information provided by:
Innovations for Poverty Action
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01047033
First received: January 8, 2010
Last updated: January 11, 2010
Last verified: January 2010
  Purpose

This purpose of this study is to determine whether a health education intervention for clients of a microcredit organization in Peru will improve health outcomes among clients and their children.


Condition Intervention
Child Health Status
Behavioral: Health education
Other: Microcredit

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Innovations for Poverty Action:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Anthropometric measures including height, weight, and blood hemoglobin level [ Time Frame: One year after intervention begins ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Client health knowledge on a variety of issues related to child health (e.g. diarrhea, fever) [ Time Frame: One year after intervention begins ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Child health status as measured by a variety of indicators (e.g. days of diarrhea, presence of bloody diarrhea, presence of severe cough, days of fever, etc.) [ Time Frame: One year after intervention begins ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Social support as measured by the Duke-UNC FSSQ [ Time Frame: One year after intervention begins ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 2453
Study Start Date: January 2007
Study Completion Date: February 2008
Primary Completion Date: February 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Microcredit only Other: Microcredit
Small loans administered to clients through the collaborating microcredit organization, to be repaid monthly over the course of six months in the context of monthly loan group meetings.
Experimental: Microcredit plus health education
Thirty minutes of a health education module administered to clients by loan officer at their monthly group meetings over the course of 8 months.
Behavioral: Health education
30 minutes of a health education module delivered to clients by loan officers during monthly repayment meetings, over the course of 8 months.
Other: Microcredit
Small loans administered to clients through the collaborating microcredit organization, to be repaid monthly over the course of six months in the context of monthly loan group meetings.

Detailed Description:

An increasingly popular scheme for poverty alleviation is microcredit, the awarding of small loans to individuals too poor or too remote to take advantage of traditional lending services. Studies have repeatedly shown that income is one of the factors strongly associated with physical and mental wellbeing. Yet economic growth alone doesn't necessarily lead to healthier families, especially if basic health knowledge or health services are absent in the community. Microcredit institutions have recently tried to address this issue by supplementing banking-only microcredit programs with programs that include "tie-ins" or "add-ons" such as health education or health services. A rigorous evaluation of such "banking-plus" endeavors has not yet been conducted, leaving a gap in the knowledge base regarding whether these organizations are meeting their stated goals in catering to both economic and social needs. This study attempts to address this research question using a randomized controlled trial of a health education intervention to clients of a microcredit organization in Peru.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Subjects must be current clients of the collaborating microcredit organization
  • Clients must be at least 18 years of age
  • Children of clients must be less than 5 years of age
  • Study participants must be able to speak and understand Spanish

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Only one client from any particular household may participate
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01047033

Locations
Peru
Innovations for Poverty Action
Pucallpa, Peru
Sponsors and Collaborators
Innovations for Poverty Action
American Medical Women's Association
University of California, Berkeley
Center for Latin American Studies at UCB
University of California, San Francisco
Interdisciplinary MPH Program at the UCB School of Public Health
Rainer Fund
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Lia Fernald, PhD MBA University of California, Berkeley
Principal Investigator: Dean Karlan, PhD MBA MPP Yale University
  More Information

No publications provided by Innovations for Poverty Action

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Rita Hamad, University of California San Francisco
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01047033     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IPA-2007-PE
Study First Received: January 8, 2010
Last Updated: January 11, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Innovations for Poverty Action:
Poverty
Global health
International health
Latin America
Peru
Child health
Microcredit
Microenterprise
Microfinance

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 23, 2014