How Fast Are we? Speed of General Versus Spinal Anesthesia for Emergency Cesarean Delivery: A Simulation Based Study

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00966680
First received: August 25, 2009
Last updated: March 14, 2014
Last verified: March 2014
  Purpose

The researchers wish to undertake a simulation based study to compare the speed of general versus spinal anesthesia for emergency cesarean delivery. Minutes may matter for the baby in an emergency. It is unknown which technique is quicker. Their hypothesis is that surgical anesthesia can be achieved as quickly with spinal as with general anesthesia.


Condition Intervention
Anesthesia
Other: Anesthesia

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Speed of General Versus Spinal Anesthesia for Emergency Cesarean Delivery: A Simulation Based Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of British Columbia:

Biospecimen Retention:   None Retained

16 anesthesiologists will be recruited for the simulation part. 100 women having elective cesarean delivery will be timed in the clinical part.


Enrollment: 19
Study Start Date: September 2009
Study Completion Date: December 2009
Primary Completion Date: December 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
1
Observational study comparing the speed of general versus spinal anesthesia during emergency cesarean
Other: Anesthesia
How long anesthesiologists take to administer general and spinal anesthesia.

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Consenting anesthesiologists, R5 residents and anesthesia fellows practicing at BC Women's Hospital.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Consenting anesthesiologists,
  • R5 residents and anesthesia fellows practicing at BC Women's Hospital

Exclusion Criteria:

-

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00966680

Locations
Canada, British Columbia
BC Women's Hospital & Health Care
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6N 3N1
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of British Columbia
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Vit Gunka, Dr. University of British Columbia
Study Director: Arry Kathirgamanathan, Dr. University of British Columbia
Study Director: Roanne Preston, Dr. University of British Columbia
Study Director: Jessica Tyler, Ms. University of British Columbia
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00966680     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: H09-01465
Study First Received: August 25, 2009
Last Updated: March 14, 2014
Health Authority: Canada: Health Canada

Keywords provided by University of British Columbia:
general anesthesia
spinal anesthesia
emergency cesarean delivery

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Emergencies
Disease Attributes
Pathologic Processes
Anesthetics
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions
Central Nervous System Agents
Therapeutic Uses

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 20, 2014