Cheno Effect on Transit in Health and IBS-C (Chenotransit)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Information provided by:
Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00912301
First received: May 29, 2009
Last updated: May 29, 2012
Last verified: May 2012
  Purpose

The study hypothesis is that the naturally occurring bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, induces acceleration of colonic transit in health and in patients with constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-C).


Condition Intervention Phase
Constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Drug: Sodium chenodeoxycholate (NaCDC)
Other: Placebo
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Pharmacodynamics Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effect of Chenodeoxycholic Acid on Gastrointestinal Transit and Colonic Functions in Health and Constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-C)

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Mayo Clinic:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Colonic Geometric Center at 24 Hours (GC24) [ Time Frame: after 4 days of treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The scintigraphic method is used to measure colonic transit. An isotope is adsorbed on activated charcoal particles and delivered to the colon in a delayed release capsule. Anterior and posterior gamma images are taken hourly. The geometric center (GC) is the weighted average of counts in the different colonic regions. The scale ranges from 1 to 5; a high GC implies faster colonic transit, a GC of 1 implies all isotope is in the ascending colon, and a GC of 5 implies all isotope is in the stool.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Colonic Transit at 48 Hours (GC48) [ Time Frame: after 4 days of treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The scintigraphic method is used to measure colonic transit. An isotope is adsorbed on activated charcoal particles and delivered to the colon in a delayed release capsule. Anterior and posterior gamma images are taken hourly. The geometric center (GC) is the weighted average of counts in the different colonic regions. The scale ranges from 1 to 5; a high GC implies faster colonic transit, a GC of 1 implies all isotope is in the ascending colon, and a GC of 5 implies all isotope is in the stool.

  • Ascending Colon Emptying (AC t_1/2) [ Time Frame: after 4 days' treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Stool Consistency [ Time Frame: after 4 days' treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The subjects rated their stool consistency using the Bristol Stool Scale. The Bristol Stool Scale is a medical aid designed to classify the form of human feces into seven categories or types. Types 1 and 2 indicate constipation with 3 and 4 being the "ideal stools" especially the latter, as they are the easiest to defecate, and 5-7 tending towards diarrhea.

  • Colonic Filling at 6 Hours [ Time Frame: after 4 days' treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Percent of the radio-labeled meal that reached the colon at 6 hours, indirectly reflecting small bowel transit time.


Enrollment: 36
Study Start Date: April 2009
Study Completion Date: December 2009
Primary Completion Date: November 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: NaCDC 500 mg
Participants randomized to this arm received 500 mg NaCDC per day for 4 days.
Drug: Sodium chenodeoxycholate (NaCDC)
500 or 1000 milligrams NaCDC per day each for a period of 4 days
Other Name: Chenodiol
Experimental: NaCDC 1000 mg
Participants randomized to this arm received 1000 mg NaCDC per day for 4 days.
Drug: Sodium chenodeoxycholate (NaCDC)
500 or 1000 milligrams NaCDC per day each for a period of 4 days
Other Name: Chenodiol
Placebo Comparator: Placebo
Participants randomized to this arm received a placebo capsule each day for 4 days.
Other: Placebo
Placebo capsules with identical appearance to the study drug were prepared by the Mayo Clinic research pharmacy.

Detailed Description:

Hypothesis: A hydrophobic di-alpha hydroxy bile salt, sodium chenodeoxycholate (CDC), delivered in a delayed release capsule to the ileocolonic region of the colon induces acceleration of colonic transit in patients with constipation-predominant IBS.

Methods: We shall study 36 patients with IBS-C, aged 18-65 years, and each treatment group will be balanced on gender and Body Mass Index (BMI) in the randomization. All patients will be assessed for symptoms of functional gastrointestinal disorder or psychological disturbance will be characterized in a standard fashion with questionnaires (Talley et al 1989), the Psychosomatic Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Inventory [HAD (Zigmond and Snaith 1983)]. With appropriate consent, a venous blood sample will be obtained from each participant for DNA extraction. Fasting Serum 7alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (7alpha-CHO) will be measured in all to ensure they do not have evidence of asymptomatic bile acid malabsorption. The normal range in our lab is <61 ng/mL.

Experimental design: A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, dose-response parallel group design, with concealed allocation. Participants will undergo an initial baseline colonic transit for 24 hours to obtain Colonic Geometric Center (GC24). Sodium chenodeoxycholate (CDC) will be delivered to the ileocolonic region to assess ascending colon and whole colonic transit in participants with IBS-C; 12 participants per group will be randomized to placebo, 0.5 or 1 gram CDC each for a period of 4 days with the transit study conducted during the last 48 hours of drug ingestion. The CDC will be placed in gelatin capsules that are coated with methacrylate (EUDRAGIT-L®), a pH-sensitive polymer that will result in release of the active ingredient in the terminal ileum.

Experimental procedure: At standardized times (hourly for first 8 hours, and at 12, 24 and 48 h), dual gamma camera scans will be obtained to measure ascending colon and overall colonic transit. Patients will fill daily diaries to evaluate stool, frequency, consistency and ease of passage.

Gastrointestinal and Colonic Transit: A validated scintigraphic method to measure gastric, small bowel, and colonic transit will be used. A methacrylate-coated capsule dissolves in the alkaline pH of the distal ileum to release 111In-labeled activated charcoal particles to evaluate colonic transit on sequential scans. Meanwhile, orally ingested 99 mTc-labeled egg meal allows measurement of gastric and small bowel transit. (Technetium [99mTc] sestamibi (trade name Cardiolite) is a pharmaceutical agent used in nuclear medicine imaging.) We have previously shown that the gastric emptying (GE) at 2 and 4 hours, colonic filling (CF) at 6 hours, and colonic geometric center (GC, weighted average of isotopic counts) in colon at 4, 24 and 48 hours provide excellent summaries of gastric emptying and colonic transit with similar diagnostic accuracy as more detailed, costly, and time-consuming analyses. The normal values for these parameters have been previously published (Cremonini et al).

Scintigraphic gastric emptying and intestinal/colonic transit analysis: A variable region of interest program will be used to measure transit, as in previous studies from our lab. Radioisotope content in each region (gastric, ascending, transverse, descending, rectosigmoid) will be corrected for decay and tissue attenuation or depth.

Anticipated Result: CDC will accelerate whole colonic transit and loosen stool form in patients with constipation predominant IBS.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Healthy volunteers:

  • Age (yr) 18-65
  • Gender (F:M)3.5 :1
  • Bowel Disease Questionnaire (BDQ) - IBS symptoms negative by Rome III criteria
  • Hospital Anxiety/Depression score <8

IBS patients:

  • Age (yr) 18-65
  • Gender (F:M) 5 :1
  • BDQ - IBS symptoms: positive by Rome III criteria
  • Hospital Anxiety/Depression score: No restrictions

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Abdominal surgery (except appendectomy or cholecystectomy)
  • GI medications during the 48h prior to transit measurement
  • Aspartate/Alanine transaminases >2 X Upper Limit of Normal (ULN)
  • Other Medications except stable doses of estrogen, thyroid, low dose antidepressants of the dopaminergic or serotonergic class
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00912301

Locations
United States, Minnesota
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, Minnesota, United States, 55905
Sponsors and Collaborators
Mayo Clinic
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Michael L. Camilleri, M.D. Mayo Clinic
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications:
Responsible Party: Michael Camilleri, M.D., Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00912301     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 08-001003, R01DK054681, R01DK079866, UL1RR024150, 1RC1DK086182
Study First Received: May 29, 2009
Results First Received: May 29, 2012
Last Updated: May 29, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Mayo Clinic:
chenodeoxycholate, IBS, transit, colon, constipation

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Syndrome
Constipation
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Signs and Symptoms, Digestive
Signs and Symptoms
Colonic Diseases, Functional
Colonic Diseases
Intestinal Diseases
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Chenodeoxycholic Acid
Cathartics
Gastrointestinal Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Pharmacologic Actions

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2014