What is the Effect of a Course for Treatment Providers on Their Patient Outcome

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Örebro University, Sweden
School of Law, Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
Information provided by:
Örebro County Council
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00902642
First received: May 13, 2009
Last updated: NA
Last verified: May 2009
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

The goal is to acquire more in-depth knowledge on physical therapists' attitudes towards and beliefs about psychosocial factors in back pain, how physical therapists integrate psychosocial factors into their clinical practice and the effects of a training program for physical therapists in psychosocial factors on clinical practice and thereby on patient outcome in terms of disability, pain, catastrophizing, and treatment satisfaction.


Condition Intervention
Pain
Behavioral: an eight day university training course designed to integrating psychosocial factors in clinical practice on a patient level

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Does Training in Psychosocial Methods for Treatment Providers Improve Outcome for Pain Patients at Risk of Long-Term Disability? A Randomised Controlled Trail of a Course for Physical Therapists

Further study details as provided by Örebro County Council:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Disability [ Time Frame: treatment start and 6 month follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • catastrophizing [ Time Frame: treatment start and 6 month follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • treatment satisfaction [ Time Frame: 6 month follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • satisfaction with treatment result [ Time Frame: 6 month follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Pain [ Time Frame: treatment start and 6 month follow up ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 364
Study Start Date: September 2004
Study Completion Date: August 2006
Primary Completion Date: August 2006 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: control group
Active Comparator: Course on psychosocial factors
an eight day university training course for physical therapists designed to integrating psychosocial factors in clinical practice on a patient level
Behavioral: an eight day university training course designed to integrating psychosocial factors in clinical practice on a patient level
an eight day university training course on psychosocial factors for physical therapists

Detailed Description:

Neck and back pain continue to be extremely common, with a high prevalence and wide socio-economic consequences all over the industrialized world. Through the years a growing interest has risen for other factors than the pure biomedical or biomechanical. This has led to a new clinical model for the treatment of back pain; the biopsychosocial model of illness. Treatment based on the biopsychosocial model not only must address the biological basis of symptoms, but must incorporate the full range of social and psychological factors that have been shown to affect pain, distress and disability.

Since there is today strong evidence indicating that psychosocial factors have a greater impact on disability then biomechanical or biomedical factors and strong evidence that psychosocial factors are strongly linked to the transition from acute to chronic pain, concept of psychosocial risk factors has been developed. Although the concept of psychosocial risk factors still is relatively new, there seems to be an international consensus about the importance of psychosocial risk factors for the prevention of the development of chronic pain but there appears to be considerable uncertainty about the clinical application.

Health care providers' (HCPs') attitudes and beliefs appear to influence the information they provide to patients. This may subsequently result in different patient outcome depending on the HCPs' attitudes and beliefs. Physical therapists attitudes and beliefs are relatively unexplored but seem to have an effect on patients' attitudes and beliefs, which can affect patient outcome in terms of sick leave, health care use and function.

HCP attitudes and beliefs towards psychosocial factors are relatively unexplored. Yet, it seems physical therapists do not necessarily accept new evidence-based information and may have difficulties in applying evidence-based information in their clinical practice. Implementation and dissemination of evidence-based psychosocial factors requires favourable attitudes, knowledge and skills to ensure a behavioural change on behave of the physical therapists.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Musculoskeletal pain,
  • Age between 18 and 65

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Sick leave for more than 3 months during the past year as a result of present the musculoskeletal pain problem
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00902642

Locations
Sweden
Mälardalens högskola
Eskilstuna, Sweden
Sponsors and Collaborators
Örebro County Council
Örebro University, Sweden
School of Law, Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
Investigators
Study Director: Steven J Linton, PH.D. Center for Health and Medical Psychology and School of Law, Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
  More Information

No publications provided by Örebro County Council

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Steven J Linton, Ph. D., Professor of Clinical Psychology, Center for Health and Medical Psychology and School of Law, Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00902642     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: M-127
Study First Received: May 13, 2009
Last Updated: May 13, 2009
Health Authority: Sweden: Regional Ethical Review Board

Keywords provided by Örebro County Council:
Physical therapy,
musculoskeletal pain,
psychosocial factors,
dissimilation,
evidence based,
education

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 22, 2014