The Health Benefits of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) for Asthma & Allergy

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Canadian Lung Association/British Columbia Lung Association
Natural Inc./Cognis GmbH (Dusseldorf, Germany)
Information provided by:
University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00876356
First received: April 3, 2009
Last updated: NA
Last verified: April 2009
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are naturally occurring free fatty acids derived from the tissues and milk of ruminant animals such as cows. CLA has multiple biological properties including regulation of metabolism and immune processes, including tissue inflammation. Asthma symptoms are caused by irritation and inflammation of the airways. Our hypothesis was that CLA may reduce airway inflammation in asthma and thus reduce asthma symptoms. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of CLA as a dietary supplement in mild asthma. Subjects will be assigned to take CLA dietary supplements or placebo (olive oil) for 12 weeks in addition to their usual asthma treatment. They will be monitored for asthma symptoms, side effects, lung function and blood markers of inflammation.


Condition Intervention
Asthma
Dietary Supplement: Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)
Dietary Supplement: Olive oil

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) as Adjunctive Therapy in Mild Asthmatics: A Pilot Study.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of British Columbia:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • PC20 - methacholine sensitivity [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Quality of life (QoL), body mass index (BMI), systemic cytokine levels, and adverse events. [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 40
Study Start Date: May 2002
Study Completion Date: September 2004
Primary Completion Date: May 2002 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: 1
Conjugated Linoleic Acid 4.5g/day in three divided doses p.o. for 12 weeks
Dietary Supplement: Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)
CLA 4.5g/day in three divided doses p.o. for 12 weeks
Placebo Comparator: 2
Olive oil 4.5g/day x 12 weeks.
Dietary Supplement: Olive oil
Olive oil 4.5g/day x 12 weeks

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Mild asthma - FEV1 > 70% predicted Positive methacholine challenge

Exclusion Criteria:

-

  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00876356

Locations
Canada, British Columbia
St. Paul's Hospital
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6Z 1Y6
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of British Columbia
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Canadian Lung Association/British Columbia Lung Association
Natural Inc./Cognis GmbH (Dusseldorf, Germany)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Delbert Dorscheid, MD, Ph.D University of British Columbia
Study Director: Ruth MacRedmond, MD, FRCPC University of British Columbia
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Dr. Delbert R. Dorscheid, University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00876356     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: P01-0180
Study First Received: April 3, 2009
Last Updated: April 3, 2009
Health Authority: Canada: Health Canada

Keywords provided by University of British Columbia:
Asthma
Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)
dietary supplement

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Asthma
Bronchial Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Hypersensitivity
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Hypersensitivity
Immune System Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014