A Survey of Factors Associated With the Successful Recognition of Agonal Breathing and Cardiac Arrest.

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00848588
First received: February 19, 2009
Last updated: March 1, 2012
Last verified: March 2012
  Purpose

The overall goal of this pilot study is to design and conduct a survey of 9-1-1 call takers in the province of Ontario, Canada to better understand the factors associated with the successful identification of cardiac arrest (including victims with agonal breathing) over the phone. Specific objectives are:

  1. To conduct iterative semi-structured interviews to identify behavioural factors influencing identification of cardiac arrest by 9-1-1 call takers;
  2. To develop a survey instrument about behavioural factors influencing the ability of 9-1-1 call takers to identify cardiac arrest based on a systematic review of the literature, the results of the semi-structured interviews, and theoretical constructs from the Theory of Planned Behaviour; and
  3. To conduct a survey among Ontario 9-1-1 call takers using the survey instrument, and to identify factors and strategies that might be targeted by Knowledge Translation interventions.

Condition
Cardiac Arrest

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: A Survey of Factors Associated With the Successful Recognition of Agonal Breathing and Cardiac Arrest by 9-1-1 Call Takers.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Ottawa Hospital Research Institute:

Enrollment: 409
Study Start Date: June 2009
Study Completion Date: September 2010
Primary Completion Date: April 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
1
Full and part-time 9-1-1 call takers employed at Ambulance Communication Centres in the Canadian provinces of Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, as well as the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

The survey will be sent to all full-time and part-time 9-1-1 call takers employed in the Canadian provinces of Ontario, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, as well as the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 9-1-1 call-takers, male or female, full or part-time, employed in an eligible Ambulance Communication Centre

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Ambulance Communication Centre Managers, support staff or administrative staff
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00848588

Locations
Canada, Ontario
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1Y 4E9
Sponsors and Collaborators
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Christian Vaillancourt, MD Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
  More Information

No publications provided by Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00848588     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: PLP 6566
Study First Received: February 19, 2009
Last Updated: March 1, 2012
Health Authority: Canada: Ethics Review Committee

Keywords provided by Ottawa Hospital Research Institute:
agonal breathing
cardiac arrest
9-1-1 call taker
survey

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Respiratory Aspiration
Heart Arrest
Respiration Disorders
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Heart Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014