Effect of Motivational Therapy on Schizophrenia With Cannabis Misuse (SCHIZOCAN)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00798109
First received: September 30, 2008
Last updated: June 13, 2014
Last verified: June 2014
  Purpose

Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness with a lifetime morbidity risk close to 1 %, involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. Prospective studies have shown that heavy use of cannabis in adolescence moderately increases the risk of developing schizophrenia. Many data have also suggested that the co-occurrence of cannabis abuse in patients with schizophrenia has a deleterious impact on the clinical outcome of schizophrenia. Cannabis abuse by schizophrenic patients is a significant public health problem for which there is no empirically validated treatment. We are presently studying the efficiency of motivational therapy on cannabis consumption in patients with schizophrenia.


Condition Intervention
Schizophrenia
Cannabis Dependence, Continuous
Behavioral: Motivational therapy
Behavioral: Usual care

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: An Open Multicentric Randomized Clinical Trial Assessing the Impact of Motivational Interviewing on Cannabis Consumption in Patients With Psychiatric Disease

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Cannabis consumption evaluated by the Time-Line Follow Back at 6 months with mean percentage of abstinent day [ Time Frame: inclusion, 3 month, 6 month, 12 month ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • PANSS, GAF, number of DSM-IV criteria of cannabis dependence, May scale for treatment response, SF-12, la URICA, number of hospitalisation, mean number of joints per week, D9THC urinanalysis at 6M and cannabis consumption evaluated by the TLFB at 6M [ Time Frame: inclusion, 3 month, 6 month, 12 month. Only inclusion and 6 month for urianalysis ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    PANSS : global, positive, negative, general scores


Enrollment: 97
Study Start Date: November 2008
Study Completion Date: April 2013
Primary Completion Date: October 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Motivational Therapy
Four motivational interview for cannabis abuse in schizophrenia population during one month
Behavioral: Motivational therapy
One hour of motivational therapy each weak during 4 weeks
Other Name: Motivational therapy
Usual Care
Usual care with intensive psychotherapy
Behavioral: Usual care
Patients received at least six hour of usual therapy, as in the experimental group
Other Name: Usual care

Detailed Description:

Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness with a lifetime morbidity risk close to 1 %, involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. Prospective studies have shown that heavy use of cannabis in adolescence moderately increases the risk of developing schizophrenia. Many data have also suggested that the co-occurrence of cannabis abuse in patients with schizophrenia has a deleterious impact on the clinical outcome of schizophrenia. Cannabis abuse by schizophrenic patients is a significant public health problem for which there is no empirically validated treatment. We are presently studying the efficiency of motivational therapy on cannabis consumption in patients with schizophrenia.

330 patients with schizophrenia and cannabis abuse or dependence (according to DSM-IV criteria) are randomly assigned to 4 motivational interview during one month or usual intensive treatment. Treatment is conducted in outpatient which are evaluated at the inclusion and at 6 month with Time-Line Follow Bach for the consumption, PANSS score, number of relapse…). A outcome measure was urinalysis results providing an objective measure of cannabis use throughout the six month of the trial.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

INCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • Schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder according to DSM-IV criteria
  • Meeting DSM-IV criteria for actual cannabis abuse or dependance
  • in current and regular contact with mental health service
  • with an age at interview of 18 years or more
  • No evidence of organic brain disease or clinically significant concurrent medical illness or learning disability
  • Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects (patients and parents).

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • Not membership to a regime of social security or to a CMU
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00798109

Locations
France
Service de psychiatrie (Pr Adès)
Colombes, France, 92700
Sponsors and Collaborators
Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Caroline DUBERTRET, MD,PhD Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00798109     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: P 070156, AOM 07007
Study First Received: September 30, 2008
Last Updated: June 13, 2014
Health Authority: France: Ministry of Health

Keywords provided by Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris:
Schizophrenia
Cannabis misuse comorbidity
Motivational interview
Randomised open trial

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Marijuana Abuse
Schizophrenia
Substance-Related Disorders
Chemically-Induced Disorders
Mental Disorders
Schizophrenia and Disorders with Psychotic Features

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 27, 2014