Trial record 11 of 259 for:    Open Studies | "Edema"

Power Spectral Analysis of Breath Sound in Pulmonary Edema

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified June 2010 by Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Taiwan University Hospital
Information provided by:
Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00767195
First received: October 2, 2008
Last updated: June 6, 2010
Last verified: June 2010
  Purpose

Pulmonary edema can be classified into "cardiogenic pulmonary edema" and "non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema" according to the underlying etiology. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema is caused by the dysfunction in the cardiac pumping capability, leading to the transudation accumulation in the pulmonary peri-capillary space. The predisposing factors of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema are numerous, including severe infection, renal failure, auto-immun reaction, etc. The mortality rate of pulmonary edema is relatively high, especially the non-cardiogenic one. To distinguish the type of pulmonary edema at the early stage is important for its treatment.

Lung sound analysis via stethoscope is a simple diagnostic method to lung diseases clinically. Among many kinds of lung sounds, the "crackle" and "rale" are frequently found in pulmonary edema. "Rale" is also called "moist rale". It is considered as low-frequency wheezes and is often seen in cardiogenic pulmonary edema. On the other hand, "crackle" is also called "dry rale", which is a kind of high-frequency wheezes and usually seen in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) that is classified into non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

This proposed project intends to establish a digital diagnostic method for pulmonary edema. The lung sound of patient with pulmonary edema will be collected by the lung sound acquisition system. By identifying the significant spectrum characteristics of cardiogenic pulmonary edema and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, the diagnostic system might be established.


Condition
Pulmonary Edema

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Power Spectral Analysis of Lung Sounds Detected at Bilateral Lung Bases in Patients With Cardiogenic and Non-cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan:

Estimated Enrollment: 60
Study Start Date: July 2008
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2009
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
1. Control group
Patients in the intensive care unit who have no pulmonary edema
2. Study group 1
Patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema in the intensive care unit
3. Study group 2
Patients with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in the intensive care unit

Detailed Description:

Pulmonary edema is caused by the disorder of liquid accumulation between lung capillary and peri-capillary tissue. This lung disease can be classified into "Cardiogenic pulmonary edema" and "Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema" according to the underlying etiology. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema is caused by the dysfunction in the cardiac pumping capability, leading to the transudation accumulation in the pulmonary peri-capillary space. Pulmonary ventilation and perfusion mismatch developed and shortness of breath ensued. The predisposing factors of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema are numerous, including severe infection, renal failure, auto-immun reaction, etc. The mortality rate of pulmonary edema is relatively high, especially the non-cardiogenic one. To distinguish the type of pulmonary edema at the early stage is important for its treatment.

Stethoscopes are widely used in clinical diagnosis in different diseases. Lung sound analysis via stethoscope is a simple diagnostic method to lung diseases clinically. Among many kinds of lung sounds, the "crackle" and "rale" are frequently found in pulmonary edema. "Rale" is also called "moist rale". It is considered as low-frequency wheezes and is often seen in cardiogenic pulmonary edema. On the other hand, "crackle" is also called "dry rale", which is a kind of high-frequency wheezes and usually seen in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) that is classified into non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

By simply listening to the lung sounds, a doctor can determine whether the patient has pulmonary edema or not, and whether the pulmonary edema if present is cardiogenic or not. This listening diagnostic method is simple and non-invasive. However, its accuracy is limited by such factors as the doctor's subjectiveness and interference from other physiological signals. Also, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish cardiogenic pulmonary edema from non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema just by auscultation only. Advanced diagnostic method (such as echocardiography) is often needed for further evaluation of lung problems.

This proposed project intends to establish a digital diagnostic method for pulmonary edema by integrating the medical expertise and resources of NTUH (National Taiwan University Hospital) and the engineering ability of NCU-EE (Department of Electrical Engineering, National Central University) in computer, electronics, and signal processing. We will apply the developed tool to lung sound acquisition hardware system for pulmonary edema diagnosis and set up an electronic diagnostic system. The lung sound of patient with pulmonary edema will be collected by this lung sound acquisition hardware system for the establishment of a Pulmonary Edema Library. By identifying the significant spectrum characteristics of cardiogenic pulmonary edema and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, the diagnostic system might be established.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   20 Years to 95 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Patients without pulmonary edema (control group), with cardiogrnic edema (study group 1) and non-cardiogrnic edema (study group 2)

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients in the intensive care unit using ventilator

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Asthma, COPD, non-ventilated patients
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00767195

Contacts
Contact: Cheng-Deng Kuo, MD,PhD 886-2-28757745 cdkuo@vghtpe.gov.tw

Locations
Taiwan
Intensive Care Unit Recruiting
Taipei, Taiwan, 112
Contact: Cheng-Deng Kuo, MD, PhD    886-2-28757745    cdkuo@vghtpe.gov.tw   
Sub-Investigator: Wen-Je Ko, MD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan
National Taiwan University Hospital
Investigators
Study Chair: Low-Tone Ho, MD Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Cheng-Deng Kuo, MD, PhD, Professor, Taipei Veterans General Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00767195     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: VGHIRB97-01-02A, 200808065R
Study First Received: October 2, 2008
Last Updated: June 6, 2010
Health Authority: Taiwan: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan:
pulmonary edema
cardiogenic
non-cardiogenic
mortality
length of stay

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Acute Lung Injury
Edema
Pulmonary Edema
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult
Lung Diseases
Lung Injury
Respiration Disorders
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 21, 2014