The Effectiveness of the Logic Back™Support.

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Logic Back
McMaster University
Information provided by:
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00754585
First received: September 4, 2008
Last updated: November 16, 2010
Last verified: November 2010
  Purpose

Back pain and chair use are the second most important health factors for the aging workforce. Besides personal suffering, postural discomfort in the workplace reduces performance and productivity, both of which can be improved by raising comfort levels. In an attempt to improve comfort and reduce injury risk, ergonomic chairs are commonly equipped with lumbar supports in an attempt to support a "neutral" spine. However, people often alter their position when such a device is in place as they arch their back to conform to it. The Logic Back support offers a simple means to alter posture and reduce associated strain on the lower back during seated tasks by supporting the "Effortless Neutral Position" or the natural curvature of the low back. Although it has been used clinically by many practitioners, its effectiveness has yet to be shown by scientific study. The current work will help to understand if and why the Logic Back is effective and how it can become a low-cost solution to reduce the discomfort of those suffering from low back pain.

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the Logic Back and the "Effortless Neutral Position" in improving comfort and functional performance during seated tasks, as compared to a standard, ergonomic chair.


Condition Intervention Phase
Low Back Pain
Posture
Device: Logic Back Grahl Duo Back Model DB11‐01
Phase 0

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: The Effectiveness of the Logic Back™Support in Promoting a Comfortable Neutral Low Back Position, Reduced Muscular Effort, Improved Performance, and Decreased Postural Shifts in Seating.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Seated CoP Shift Rate: The CoP wil be measured by use of a TEKSCAN CONFORMat system - a thin sensing mat that is placed on the chair surface and measures the relative pressure applied by the legs and buttocks during seated tasks. [ Time Frame: 30 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Functional Performance (Task Repetition Frequency)- three dynamic, seated performance tests are used and include: Test 1 - "Waist level-Up", Test 2 - "Eye level-down", and Test 3 - "Overhead work". [ Time Frame: 5 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Self-Reports of Comfort: Tests such as the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) or mapping by body area will be used. Participants will also be asked to record their current level of discomfort on a 10cm VAS for each body area. [ Time Frame: 5 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Postural Quantification: Electromagnetic sensors (Polhemus 3-space Isotrak system) will allow for the continuous and automatic monitoring of key body landmark positions and orientations in space. [ Time Frame: 2 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • RMS-EMG (Muscular Exertion): Following standard skin preparation (shaving as needed, alcohol cleansing and mild abrasion) surface electrodes (10 mm Ag-AgCL, 1 cm interspace) will be applied and oriented parallel to the target muscles. [ Time Frame: 2 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Evaluation of Spinal Loads: Load on the spine is a combined effect of the posture, muscle activity and task being performed. The UM3D model is a validated lift task analysis system. [ Time Frame: 2 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 24
Study Start Date: August 2008
Study Completion Date: October 2009
Primary Completion Date: October 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
I
All participants will perform the five Chair Support tasks: (1) quiet standing, sitting, (2) upper back unsupported, (3) sitting, upper back unsupported with Logic Back in place, (4) sitting in a standard ergonomic chair, and (5) sitting in a standard ergonomic chair with Logic Back in place. Aside from the Quiet Standing trials which will be performed first, the order of Chair Support will be randomized. Participants will perform the Chair Support task for 30 minutes while quietly watching a movie DVD of their choice. The DVDs provided will the "light" in content without a lot of suspense or emotion. Data will be collected for the final two minutes of each 30-minute trial.
Device: Logic Back Grahl Duo Back Model DB11‐01
The device is placed against the back rest of a chair. The tension of the straps are adjusted for each participant to obtain the ENP.

Detailed Description:

Seventeen of the top Canadian occupations typically have workers sitting a significant proportion of their work day. An average of 30% of Ontario WSIB lost time claims since 1996 involve low back injury. The return to work objective for twenty percent of these patients requires prolonged sitting in their work stations. While a number of these studies have claimed a relationship between sitting and LBP, the relationship is complex. Back pain and chair use are the second most important health factors for the aging workforce. The odds ratio for LBP is estimated for seated tasks at 1.9721. Prolonged and monotonous, low-level mechanical loads associated with a seated posture are thought to provoke pain.

Besides personal suffering, postural discomfort in the workplace reduces performance and productivity, both of which can be improved by raising comfort levels. According to Corlett (2006), other lumbar supports do not exert enough pressure on the spine to actually change its configuration. However, the patient often alters their posture when such a device is in place as they arch their back to conform to it. The Logic Back support offers a simple means to alter posture and reduce associated strain on the lower back during seated tasks by promoting the neutral standing lordotic posture. Clinically, it has been shown to support the ENP or the natural standing lordotic posture. Although its clinical applicability has been accepted by many practitioners, its effectiveness in improving seated comfort and functional task performance has yet to be quantified in LBP patients who perform seated tasks. This study will help to understand why the Logic Back or ENP must be considered when planning return-to-work goals and methods to reduce first-time injury incidence in the workplace.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   20 Years to 55 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Males only, ages between 20-55 years of age

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Male
  • Between ages of 20-55
  • With or without lower back pain

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants currently experiencing neck, shoulder or arm pain
  • Participants who have low back pain of non-musculoskeletal origin
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00754585

Locations
Canada, Ontario
McMaster University
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4L8
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College
North York, Ontario, Canada, M2H 3J1
Sponsors and Collaborators
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College
Logic Back
McMaster University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: John J. Triano, DC, PhD, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00754585     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 082007
Study First Received: September 4, 2008
Last Updated: November 16, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Back Pain
Low Back Pain
Pain
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 29, 2014