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Effectiveness and Safety of Inhaling Hypertonic Saline in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Federal University of São Paulo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00639236
First received: March 14, 2008
Last updated: March 19, 2008
Last verified: March 2008
  Purpose

The use of inhaled hypertonic saline has been extensively documented in asthma, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis and COPD as method of bronchial challenge and sputum induction, but studies that evaluated others endpoints are required. The objective of this study was to analyse the effects of inhaling hypertonic saline compared with placebo with respect to functional exercise capacity, dyspnoea and quality of life. In a double-blind randomised parallel placebo-controlled trial, conducted at the Clínicas Integradas of the Evangelical Faculty of Paraná,sixty-eight patients (age 67 ± 6.5 years; FEV1 38.9 ± 16.2 predicted) were randomised to inhale 3% hypertonic saline (n=34) or placebo (n=34), combined with a program of exercise, three times a week, for 8-weeks.


Condition Intervention Phase
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Other: hypertonic saline
Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effectiveness and Safety of Inhaling Hypertonic Saline in the Functional Exercise Capacity of Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: a Randomized Trial

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Federal University of São Paulo:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Functional exercise capacity [ Time Frame: measured by the 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) test ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Dyspnoea [ Time Frame: measured by the Medical Research Council dyspnoea score ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

Enrollment: 68
Study Start Date: May 2004
Study Completion Date: November 2006
Primary Completion Date: September 2004 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intervention Details:
    Other: hypertonic saline
    inhaled hypertonic saline (at a dose of 5 ml of a 3% solution) three times a week, combined with a program of physical exercises.
Detailed Description:

Background: The use of inhaled hypertonic saline has been extensively documented in asthma, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis and COPD as method of bronchial challenge and sputum induction, but studies that evaluated others endpoints are required. Objective: To analyse the effects of inhaling hypertonic saline compared with placebo with respect to functional exercise capacity, dyspnoea and quality of life. Design and Setting: This was a double-blind randomised parallel placebo-controlled trial, conducted at the Clínicas Integradas of the Evangelical Faculty of Paraná. Methods: sixty-eight patients (age 67 ± 6.5 years; FEV1 38.9 ± 16.2 predicted) were randomised to inhale 3% hypertonic saline (n=34) or placebo (n=34), combined with a program of exercise, three times a week, for 8-weeks. Results: After the 8-weeks the treatment period, both groups showed significant changes in functional exercise capacity (p<0,001), dyspnoea (p<0,001) and quality of life. When compared both groups, there was a significant improvement in placebo group in functional exercise capacity (p<0,001). Conclusion: the present study concluded that inhaling HS reduces the functional capacity, compared to placebo and being associated with the appearance of coughs and bronchial spasms.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   40 Years to 75 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with COPD diagnosis based on clinical findings and spirometry (FEV1 < 60% predict) according to American Thoracic Society20 clinically stable for at least the last month
  • aged between 40 and 75 years old
  • ex-smokers
  • without severe and/or unstable heart disease or any other pathologic conditions that could impair physical activities (e.g., cerebrovascular diseases and rheumatism), were included.
  • Respiratory medication was permitted, prior and throughout the duration of the study, such as bronchodilators and corticosteroids.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with unstable lung disease (as evidenced by the administration of intravenous antibiotics for four weeks before screening)
  • evidence of reactive airways (FEV1 ≥ 20 percent response to bronchodilatation or clinical diagnosis of asthma) were excluded
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00639236

Sponsors and Collaborators
Federal University of São Paulo
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Valderramas R Silvia, pHD Federal University of Sao Paulo
  More Information

No publications provided by Federal University of São Paulo

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Silvia Regina Valderramas, Evangelical Faculty of Paraná
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00639236     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 017/04, 017/04
Study First Received: March 14, 2008
Last Updated: March 19, 2008
Health Authority: Brazil: Ministry of Health

Keywords provided by Federal University of São Paulo:
COPD
Hypertonic saline
Quality of life
Dyspnoea.

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Lung Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Respiratory Tract Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 24, 2014