Training Cognitive Control Processes in Older Adults

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Yaakov Stern, Columbia University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00586638
First received: December 20, 2007
Last updated: November 20, 2012
Last verified: November 2012
  Purpose

Control processes are classes of brain activity that initiate, coordinate, synchronize, and regulate elemental cognitive functions for the conduct of goal-directed behavior. The proposed research investigates whether exposure to a computer-based training protocol designed to enhance cognitive control processes will improve cognitive performance in healthy older adults.


Condition Intervention
Neurologic Manifestations
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Behavioral: Video game based training

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Official Title: Pilot Study Using a Video Game to Train Cognitive Control Processes in Healthy Older Adults

Further study details as provided by Columbia University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Neuropsychological testing [ Time Frame: Week 1, 12, 24 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Cognitive-experimental tasks [ Time Frame: Week 1, 6, 12, 24 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 60
Study Start Date: December 2007
Study Completion Date: February 2010
Primary Completion Date: February 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1
Video Game play with training strategy
Behavioral: Video game based training
36 one-hour sessions over 12 weeks
Active Comparator: 2
Video game play without training strategy
Behavioral: Video game based training
36 one-hour sessions over 12 weeks
No Intervention: 3
Minimal contact control

Detailed Description:

The proposed research investigates whether exposure to a computer-based training protocol designed to enhance cognitive control processes will improve cognitive performance in healthy older adults. Cognitively normal adults aged 60-75 will be randomized into three experimental groups: 1) Video game play with training strategy; 2) Video game play without training strategy (Active Control); 3) Minimal contact (Passive Control). Subjects in Groups 1 and 2 will be instructed to play the complex, high-demand video game, Space Fortress, for 36 one-hour sessions over 12 weeks. Subjects in Group 3 will receive all assessments but will not play the computer game.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   60 Years to 75 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 60-75
  • Willingness to adhere to training protocol
  • Adequate English proficiency

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Known history of cognitive impairment, dementia, stroke, seizure disorder, or other neuropsychiatric condition judged to impact cognitive performance
  • Taking medications known to influence cognitive performance
  • Sensory (e.g. visual, auditory) or physical (e.g. severe arthritic, orthopedic, neurologic) impairment incompatible with use of a standard computer workstation.
  • Enrolled in a concurrent study that could affect the outcome of this study
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00586638

Locations
United States, New York
Columbia University Medical Center
New York, New York, United States, 10032
Sponsors and Collaborators
Columbia University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Yaakov Stern, Ph.D. Columbia University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Yaakov Stern, Professor of Clinical, Department of Neurology Administration, Columbia University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00586638     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: AAAC6151
Study First Received: December 20, 2007
Last Updated: November 20, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Columbia University:
cognition
cognition disorders
executive function
cognitive control
attentional control
biomedical enhancement
cognitive enhancement
computerized
computer-based
video game

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Neurologic Manifestations
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 22, 2014