Non-prescription Versus Prescription Topical Treatments Versus no Treatment in the Control of Sweating

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Northwestern University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00509886
First received: July 31, 2007
Last updated: May 25, 2011
Last verified: May 2011
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the prescription treatment compared to the non-prescription treatment. It is hypothesized that the prescription treatment will have a significantly greater effect than the non-prescription treatment on decreasing excess sweating.


Condition Intervention
Hyperhidrosis
Excess Sweating
Drug: Drysol
Drug: Drioff

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Non-prescription Versus Prescription Topical Treatments Versus no Treatment in the Control of Sweating

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Northwestern University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Gravimetric analysis [ Time Frame: 3 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Subject sweat assessment [ Time Frame: 3 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • HDSS [ Time Frame: 3 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 24
Study Start Date: June 2007
Study Completion Date: August 2007
Primary Completion Date: August 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1
ARMs were randomized. One side of the body received treatment with one antiperspirant and the contralateral side with a different antiperspirant.
Drug: Drysol
20% aluminum chloride hexahydrate
Experimental: 2
ARMs were randomized. One side of the body received treatment with one antiperspirant and the contralateral side with a different antiperspirant.
Drug: Drioff
1% aluminum acetate

Detailed Description:

The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the prescription treatment compared to the non-prescription treatment. It is hypothesized that the prescription treatment will have a significantly greater effect than the non-prescription treatment on decreasing excess sweating.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 30 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • age 21-30 years
  • males and females
  • The subjects are in good health.
  • The subjects have willingness and the ability to understand and provide informed consent for participation in the study.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Subjects with primary hyperhidrosis
  • Subjects who are unable to withstand prolonged heat exposure or who have self-reported history of cardiovascular or respiratory disorders.
  • Subjects who are unable to give informed consent.
  • Subjects with mental illness.
  • Subjects who are pregnant or nursing.
  • Subjects with systemic or local skin disease and/or infection that may interfere with the conduct of the study.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00509886

Locations
United States, Illinois
Northwestern University Dermatology
Chicago, Illinois, United States, 60611
Sponsors and Collaborators
Northwestern University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Murad Alam, MD Northwestern University dermatology
Study Director: Dennis West, PhD Northwestern University dermatology
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Murad Alam, MD, Northwestern University Dermatology department
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00509886     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: STU00000722
Study First Received: July 31, 2007
Last Updated: May 25, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hyperhidrosis
Sweat Gland Diseases
Skin Diseases
Aluminum chloride
Astringents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions
Dermatologic Agents
Therapeutic Uses

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014