Resident Surveillance of Pediatric Patient Developmental Status at the Two Month Preventive Care Visit

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sarah Nyp, Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00465361
First received: April 23, 2007
Last updated: February 6, 2012
Last verified: December 2011
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of individualized performance feedback coupled with an educational module in improving resident performance of the physical and developmental examination component of developmental surveillance of infants at the two month preventive care visit.


Condition Intervention
Growth & Development
Child Development
Internship and Residency
Education, Medical
Developmental Disabilities
Procedure: performance feedback with an educational module

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: Evaluation of Resident Surveillance of Pediatric Patient Developmental Status at the Two Month Preventive Care Visit

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Presence of Resident Surveillance Behaviors of Specific Aspects of Developmental Status at the Two Month Preventive Care Visit [ Time Frame: Residents were observed during each of the eligible preventive care visits. Each visit was an average of 20 minutes in length. Preventive care visits were observed over a 13 month time period. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Residents were observed to determine whether specific aspects of infant developmental status, as part of developmental surveillance, were assessed during the two-month preventive care visit. The components of developmental surveillance observed were: assessment of the infant's ability to follow past midline, assessment of the infant's ability to lift his/her head off of the table in prone, assessment of the infant's ability to hold an object placed in his/her hand, assessment of the infant's ability to coo, and assessment of the infant's ability to demonstrate a social smile.


Enrollment: 7
Study Start Date: May 2007
Study Completion Date: July 2008
Primary Completion Date: July 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: Baseline Performance
Observation of baseline performance
Experimental: Post-intervention Performance
Observation of performance post-intervention
Procedure: performance feedback with an educational module
individual performance feedback with an educational module

Detailed Description:

Many children in the United States have developmental or behavioral disabilities. The American Academy of Pediatrics recently published a policy statement outlining recommendations for developmental surveillance and screening of infants and young children. One of the Academy's recommendations was for inclusion of developmental surveillance during all preventive care visits. The five components of developmental surveillance include elicitation and attendance to parental concerns, maintenance of the developmental history, observation of the child through physical and developmental examinations, identification of risk and protective factors, and documentation of surveillance findings and process (referral, follow-up, etc.).

As a result of concerns expressed by the public regarding accountability in medical education and health care, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Medical Specialties mandated that training programs shift to a competency based assessment system. The focus of this study will be to assess the impact of performance feedback (based upon video recorded observation) coupled with an educational module on resident demonstration of competency in regard to the physical and developmental examinations component of developmental surveillance of infants at the two month preventive care visit.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Categorical pediatric residents in their second year of training at Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics who are scheduled to see infants for a two month preventive care visit.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Preventive care visits for infants who have parents/guardians who do not speak English fluently
  • Preventive care visits for infants who have a previously identified genetic or other medical syndrome or developmental delay
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00465361

Locations
United States, Missouri
Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics
Kansas City, Missouri, United States, 64108
Sponsors and Collaborators
Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Sarah S Nyp, MD Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Sarah Nyp, Medical Physician, Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00465361     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 07 02-027E
Study First Received: April 23, 2007
Results First Received: February 8, 2011
Last Updated: February 6, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City:
Growth and Development
Child Development
Developmental Surveillance
Medical Education
Internship and Residency

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Developmental Disabilities
Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 23, 2014