Schistosomiasis in Formal and Non-Formal Schools in Uganda: Implications for Control Programmes

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00463593
First received: April 19, 2007
Last updated: January 23, 2008
Last verified: January 2008
  Purpose

Current efforts to control schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthes infections focus on the school-age population, and school-based treatment delivery programs offer a major cost advantages because of the use of the existing school infrastructure and the fact that schoolchildren are accessible through schools. However, in many developing countries, large numbers of school-age children are not in school and this has raised questions about the effectiveness of school-based programs in reaching non-enrolled children. Increasingly, the non-formal education sector is providing a growing solution to the problem of poor enrolment in basic education, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, and has recently been used to deliver praziquantel as part of a national schistosomiasis control program in Uganda. However, it is unclear how effective this program has been in reaching children who attend non-formal schools and whether the program has been reaching children from the poorest households.


Condition
Schistosomiasis
Helminthiasis
Anaemia

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Schistosomiasis in Formal and Non-Formal Schools in Uganda: Implications for Control

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development:

Biospecimen Retention:   None Retained

faeces blood


Enrollment: 1293
Study Start Date: December 2006
Study Completion Date: June 2007
Groups/Cohorts
2
children enrolled in formal schools and children not enrolled in formal schools

Detailed Description:

This study will compare infection and nutritional status of children enrolled in formal schools and non-formal schools, and non-enrolled children in Nakasongola District in Uganda, and investigate the process and impact of treatment delivered by the national control program. The study will consist of household surveys and cross-sectional parasitological and hematological surveys, with follow-up six months later. The evaluation will take place over the course of a year and will:

  • Compare the infection and nutritional status of children enrolled in formal schools and non-formal schools, and non-enrolled children in Nakasongola District, Uganda
  • Compare programmatic process indicators, including enrolment rates, attendance rates, access to water and sanitation, treatment coverage in formal and non-formal schools
  • Investigate the impact of treatment on intensity of infection and reinfection rates in formal and non-formal schools.
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 18 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

children enrolled in formal schools and children not enrolled in formal school identified by household survey

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • School children in grad 1 and 2
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00463593

Locations
Uganda
Vector Control Division
Kampala, Uganda
Sponsors and Collaborators
DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Narcis Kabatereine, Dr Vector Control Division, Ministry of Health Uganda
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00463593     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SRP-UG-NK-06
Study First Received: April 19, 2007
Last Updated: January 23, 2008
Health Authority: Uganda: Ministry of Health

Keywords provided by DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development:
schistosomiasis
helminthes
anaemia

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Anemia
Helminthiasis
Schistosomiasis
Hematologic Diseases
Parasitic Diseases
Trematode Infections

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 16, 2014