SERETIDE 100/50 bd (Twice Daily) Versus FLIXOTIDE 100 bd As Initial Maintenance Therapy In Moderate Asthma In Adults

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
GlaxoSmithKline
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00461500
First received: April 17, 2007
Last updated: March 22, 2012
Last verified: March 2012
  Purpose

This study will compare during 12 weeks, two treatment strategies for Initial Maintenance Therapy : fluticasone propionate alone or the salmeterol/fluticasone propionate combination in adults with moderate persistent asthma


Condition Intervention Phase
Asthma
Drug: Salmeterol xinafoate/fluticasone propionate combination
Drug: Fluticasone propionate
Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double-Blind
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: See Detailed Description

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by GlaxoSmithKline:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change From Baseline in Mean Morning Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) Over Weeks 5-12 [ Time Frame: Baseline, Weeks 5-12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Mini Wright Peak Flow Meter used to allow patients to monitor their asthma - Peak Flow (or PEF - peak expiratory flow) is a measurement of how fast you can blow out. When someone is well, their PEF is higher - when the airways are narrow (as in asthma), PEF is lower. Readings based on age, height and gender.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change From Baseline in Pre-dose FEV1 (Forced Expiratory Volume in One Second) Through Week 12 (Using Last Observation Carried Forward [LOCF] Approach) [ Time Frame: Baseline through Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    FEV1 is the amount of air (in liters) you can blow out within one second. A spirometer is the device used to measure FEV1. With normal lungs and airways you can normally blow out most of the air from your lungs within one second. Age, height and gender is used to determine what is normal. Change from baseline could have been measured at any time during the study (up to Week 12), using the LOCF. In the LOCF approach, for each individual, missing values are replaced by the last observed value of that variable.

  • Change From Baseline in Pre-dose (Percent Predicted) FEV1 Through Week 12 (Using Last Observation Carried Forward [LOCF] Approach) [ Time Frame: Baseline through Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Percent predicted is based on tables of normal values that use variables such as age, gender, and weight as a method of standardization. Spirometry results are expressed as a percentage, and are generally considered abnormal if less than 80 percent of the normal predicted value. Change from baseline could have been measured at any time during the study (up to Week 12), using the LOCF. In the LOCF approach, for each individual, missing values are replaced by the last observed value of that variable.

  • Change From Baseline in FEV1 Reversibility Through Week 12 (Using Last Observation Carried Forward [LOCF] Approach) [ Time Frame: Baseline through Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Reversibility is calculated as the percentage improvement of FEV1 from baseline. Change from baseline could have been measured at any time during the study (up to Week 12), using the LOCF. In the LOCF approach, for each individual, missing values are replaced by the last observed value of that variable. Percent reversibility of FEV1 was calculated as follows: (Post-bronchodilator FEV1 - pre-bronchodilator FEV1)/pre-bronchodilator FEV1 x 100. A negative difference indicates less reversibility.

  • Change From Baseline in Pre-dose Forced Expiratory Vital Capacity (FVC) Through Week 12 (Using Last Observation Carried Forward [LOCF] Approach) [ Time Frame: Baseline through Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    FVC is the total amount of air that can forcibly be blown out after full inspiration, measured in liters. A spirometer is the device used to measure FVC. Age, height and gender is used to determine what is normal. Change from baseline could have been measured at any time during the study (up to Week 12), using the LOCF. In the LOCF approach, for each individual, missing values are replaced by the last observed value of that variable.

  • Change From Baseline (BL) in Pre-dose FEF 25-75% (Forced Expiratory Flow) Through Week 12 (Using Last Observation Carried Forward [LOCF] Approach) [ Time Frame: Baseline through Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Forced Expiratory Flow 25-75% (measured by a spirometer) is the average flow (or speed) of air coming out of the lung during the middle portion of the expiration. Age, height, and gender is used to determine what is normal. Change from BL could have been measured at any time during the study (up to Week 12), using the LOCF (for each individual, missing values are replaced by the last observed value of that variable). Change from BL is measured as percentage of predicted value, with height, gender, age, and race as variables (percentage of predicted value at endpoint minus value at BL).

  • Number of Participants With at Least One Exacerbation During 12-Week Treatment Period [ Time Frame: 12-Week Treatment Period (Week 1 through Week 12) ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Subjects will record exacerbations (defined as temporary PEF decrease, increase in salbutamol use) in a Daily Record Card (DRC). The number of events are categorized as those that showed a deterioration in asthma requiring administration of oral corticosteroids and/or a deterioration in asthma requiring emergency room visit and/or hospitalization (hosp.).

  • Number of Participants Who Achieved Well-Controlled Asthma During Weeks 5-12 [ Time Frame: Weeks 5 -12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Well-controlled asthma is defined as 2 or more of the following: symptoms on no more than 2 days with symptom score of >1; no more than 2 days of rescue meds (maximum of 4 per week); >=80% predicted morning PEF. And no night time awakenings, exacerbations, emergency room visits, and treatment related adverse effects requiring a change to therapy. The number of participants who achieved "well-controlled" asthma at any time during Week 5-12 of the study period will be summarized by treatment groups. The difference between treatment groups will be assessed using logistic regression.

  • Median Number of Weeks to First Achieve Well-Controlled Asthma During Weeks 5-12 [ Time Frame: Weeks 5 - 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Well-controlled asthma is defined as 2 or more of the following: symptoms on no more than 2 days with symptom score of >1; no more than 2 days of rescue meds (maximum of 4 per week); >=80% predicted morning PEF. And no night time awakenings, exacerbations, emergency room visits, and treatment related adverse effects requiring a change to therapy. The median number of weeks to first achieve "well-controlled" asthma during Week 5-12 of the study period will be summarized by treatment groups. The difference between treatment groups will be assessed using logistic regression.

  • Number of Participants Who Achieved Total-controlled Asthma During Weeks 5-12 [ Time Frame: Weeks 5 - 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Totally-controlled asthma is defined as no daily symptoms, no night-time awakenings, no exacerbations, no rescue medication, no emergency visits, no treatment related adverse events resulting in change in asthma therapy, >=80% predicted PEF. The number of subjects who achieved "total-controlled" asthma at any time during Week 5-12 of the study period will be summarized by treatment groups. The difference between treatment groups will be assessed using logistic regression.

  • Change From Baseline in Asthma Control Test (ACT) Score at Week 12 [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    5 question test with various responses rating frequency of asthma events over 4-week period. Questions include occurrence of asthma affecting work/school; causing shortness of breath; symptoms (wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, pain) wake you up at night; causing need for rescue medication; asthma control. Scale: 1=all of time, 2=most of time, 3=some of the time, 4=a little of the time, 5=none of the time. Possible ACT scores range from 5 to 25.

  • ACT Score in Classes at Week 12 [ Time Frame: Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Score is ranged from 5 (poor control) to 25 (complete control).

  • Change From Baseline in Overall Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) Score at Week 12 [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 12 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    7-point scale where 1=total impairment and 7=no impairment. Questions contain 32 items in four domains. Domains include Activity Limitation (11 items), Symptoms (12 items), Emotional Function (5 items), and Environmental Stimuli (4 items). 32 items produce one overall quality of life score. The 7 points scoring are different and depend on the item : they are the translation in French of the original questionnaire from Juniper. Possible AQLQ scores range from 1 to 7 (the mean of all the questions).


Enrollment: 81
Study Start Date: March 2007
Study Completion Date: December 2007
Primary Completion Date: December 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intervention Details:
    Drug: Salmeterol xinafoate/fluticasone propionate combination
    SFC 100
    Other Name: SERETIDE FLIXOTIDE
    Drug: Fluticasone propionate
    FP 100
Detailed Description:

A multicentre randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study to compare the salmeterol/fluticasone propionate combination (SERETIDETM DISKUSTM 50/100) 50/100µg one inhalation twice daily with fluticasone propionate (FLIXOTIDETM DISKUSTM 100) 100µg one inhalation twice daily as initial maintenance therapy for 12 weeks in adults with persistent moderate asthma

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 40 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

  • male or female ≥ 18
  • documented history of asthma
  • reversibility FEV1 or PEF ≥ 12% (post 400µg salbu)
  • moderate asthma (daily symptoms, daily rescue use, PEF = 60-80% predicted value)
  • naive or ≥ 4weeks-free ICS (inhaled corticosteroids)

Exclusion criteria:

  • respiratory disorder
  • FEV1<60% predicted
  • exacerbation/respiratory infection ≤ 4 weeks
  • oral/parenteral/depot corticosteroids ≤ 6 months
  • LABA/oral β2 agonist/ ALT/ theophylline ≤ 4 weeks
  • smoker or former smoker ≥ 5 packs year
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00461500

Sponsors and Collaborators
GlaxoSmithKline
Investigators
Study Director: GSK Clinical Trials, MD GlaxoSmithKline
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Study Director, GSK
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00461500     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SAM108037
Study First Received: April 17, 2007
Results First Received: December 19, 2008
Last Updated: March 22, 2012
Health Authority: France: Afssaps - Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des produits de santé (Saint-Denis)

Keywords provided by GlaxoSmithKline:
persistent
moderate
asthma
adults
Initial
Maintenance
Therapy

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Asthma
Bronchial Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Hypersensitivity
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Hypersensitivity
Immune System Diseases
Salmeterol
Albuterol
Fluticasone
Fluticasone, salmeterol drug combination
Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists
Adrenergic beta-Agonists
Adrenergic Agonists
Adrenergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Pharmacologic Actions
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Bronchodilator Agents
Autonomic Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Anti-Asthmatic Agents
Respiratory System Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Tocolytic Agents
Reproductive Control Agents
Dermatologic Agents

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 23, 2014