FHA: Characterization of Metabolic Status, Brain Circuitry, and Stress-Reactivity

This study has been withdrawn prior to enrollment.
(prior to participant recruitment, PI left Emory, study stopped)
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Emory University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00453219
First received: March 26, 2007
Last updated: October 29, 2013
Last verified: October 2013
  Purpose

Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea (FHA), the spontaneous cessation of the menstrual cycle for at least 6 months after menstrual cyclicity has been established, is a common and reversible form of anovulation not due to discernible organic causes. Whereas animal studies suggest an interaction of metabolic and psychosocial stress in the genesis of FHA, the distinct central mechanisms in humans are not clear. On a behavioral level, FHA appears to depend on a complex interplay between individual stress susceptibility, stressful life events, and enduring metabolic challenge due to inappropriate attitudes towards eating and body image. We will use a comparison group of ovulatory, eumenorrheic women (EW) and a contrast group of lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Although women with FHA and PCOS present with anovulation, each condition differs markedly in pathobiology (and health burden). Contrasting women with FHA to those with PCOS will afford an opportunity to understand more about the interaction between metabolism, stress, and reproduction and to determine the extent to which differences between FHA and EW are attributable to reproductive compromise (anovulation) per se versus specific to the pathogenesis of FHA or PCOS. We have used this approach to great advantage in the past to show that hypercortisolemia was confined to FHA and not PCOS (Berga 1997) and that dysfunctional (unrealistic) attitudes and decreased coping skills were reported more often in FHA than in PCOS and more in PCOS than EW. Further, this approach of comparing 3 groups will allow us to improve therapeutic approaches for two principle causes of anovulatory infertility in women. To accomplish this, we will study women with FHA, PCOS, and normal ovulatory women. The study will take place over 2 months and women will make 4-5 outpatient visits to the Clinical Integration Network Center and will have one overnight stay for frequent blood sampling.


Condition Intervention
Anovulation
FHA
Eumenorrhea
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Procedure: Screening evaluation
Procedure: Meal Response
Genetic: Blood Collection
Procedure: Functional MRI
Procedure: Endocrine Assessment

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea: Characterization of Metabolic Status, Brain Circuitry, and Stress-reactivity

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Emory University:

Biospecimen Retention:   Samples With DNA

Blood samples will be collected, processed, and stored for the evaluation of genetic markers assocaited with stress vulnerability. Serum and plasma specimens will be collected and stored for the evaluation of factors associated with the regulation of reproduction.


Enrollment: 0
Study Start Date: July 2011
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
1
Women ages 18-35 years with regular ovulatory menstrual cycles
Procedure: Screening evaluation
A detailed history will be taken and a physical examination performed along with a blood sample to verify ovulatory status in women with regular cycles and determine cause of anovulation in women with irregular or absent menstrual cycles.
Procedure: Meal Response
The investigators are interested in how nutrition and metabolism can influence reproduction and they will look at how the body senses hunger and how it responses to food. Blood samples will be collected and questionnaires given to assess responses and feeling about hunger and food.
Genetic: Blood Collection
A blood sample will be collected and used to check for genetic markers of stress vulnerability.
Procedure: Functional MRI
research participants will have an functional MRI scan of their brain while reviewing word lists associated with body image and emotions. This procedure will last about 1 hour.
Procedure: Endocrine Assessment
research participants will have a 30 hour inpatient hospital admission with every 15 minute blood sampling for 24 hours. Hormone measures of stress, reproduction, and appetite will be obtained.
2
Women ages 18-35 years with irregular or absent menstrual periods due to functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) also called stress-induced anovulation
Procedure: Screening evaluation
A detailed history will be taken and a physical examination performed along with a blood sample to verify ovulatory status in women with regular cycles and determine cause of anovulation in women with irregular or absent menstrual cycles.
Procedure: Meal Response
The investigators are interested in how nutrition and metabolism can influence reproduction and they will look at how the body senses hunger and how it responses to food. Blood samples will be collected and questionnaires given to assess responses and feeling about hunger and food.
Genetic: Blood Collection
A blood sample will be collected and used to check for genetic markers of stress vulnerability.
Procedure: Functional MRI
research participants will have an functional MRI scan of their brain while reviewing word lists associated with body image and emotions. This procedure will last about 1 hour.
Procedure: Endocrine Assessment
research participants will have a 30 hour inpatient hospital admission with every 15 minute blood sampling for 24 hours. Hormone measures of stress, reproduction, and appetite will be obtained.
3
Women ages 18-35 years with irregular or absent menstrual periods due to polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS).
Procedure: Screening evaluation
A detailed history will be taken and a physical examination performed along with a blood sample to verify ovulatory status in women with regular cycles and determine cause of anovulation in women with irregular or absent menstrual cycles.
Procedure: Meal Response
The investigators are interested in how nutrition and metabolism can influence reproduction and they will look at how the body senses hunger and how it responses to food. Blood samples will be collected and questionnaires given to assess responses and feeling about hunger and food.
Genetic: Blood Collection
A blood sample will be collected and used to check for genetic markers of stress vulnerability.
Procedure: Functional MRI
research participants will have an functional MRI scan of their brain while reviewing word lists associated with body image and emotions. This procedure will last about 1 hour.
Procedure: Endocrine Assessment
research participants will have a 30 hour inpatient hospital admission with every 15 minute blood sampling for 24 hours. Hormone measures of stress, reproduction, and appetite will be obtained.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Women ages 18-35

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Inclusion criteria for participation are a gynecological age (age since menarche) > 5 and < 25 years, and chronological age > 18 years, within 90-110% of ideal body weight as determined by the 1983 Metropolitan height and weight table for women, and exercise < 10 h/wk and run < 10 mi/wk, day-awake/night-asleep schedule.
  • Women in the FHA and PCOS groups have to fulfill the diagnostic criteria of FHA or PCOS and to have all other causes of amenorrhea and anovulation excluded.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Exclusion criteria are smoking, medications, including psychotropic or illicit drugs, medical, neurological, or ophthalmologic disease except acuity problems, a weight loss or gain of > 10 lb within a year preceding or since the onset of amenorrhea, a major Axis I disorder other than depression, parturition in the last 12 months and/or lactating in the last 6 months.
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00453219

Locations
United States, Georgia
Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30322
Sponsors and Collaborators
Emory University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Sarah L Berga, MD Emory University
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Emory University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00453219     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB00024918
Study First Received: March 26, 2007
Last Updated: October 29, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Food and Drug Administration
United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Anovulation
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Ovarian Diseases
Adnexal Diseases
Genital Diseases, Female
Gonadal Disorders
Endocrine System Diseases
Ovarian Cysts
Cysts
Neoplasms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 24, 2014