Epstein-Barr Virus as a Possible Cause for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Ohio State University
Information provided by:
University of Mississippi Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00433355
First received: February 7, 2007
Last updated: March 18, 2009
Last verified: March 2009
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand what causes a continuing fatigue for a long time with a number of symptoms occurring at the same time (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-CFS). Epstein Barr Virus is among the group of viruses that have been associated with a continuing fatigue for a long time with a number of symptoms occurring at the same time, but the cause is still unknown.


Condition
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Studies on Epstein-Barr Virus as a Possible Etiological Agent for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Mississippi Medical Center:

Enrollment: 15
Study Start Date: January 2007
Study Completion Date: October 2008
Primary Completion Date: August 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the etiological agent for heterophile positive infectious mononucleosis (IM). It is also an oncogenic herpes virus associated with African Burkitt's lymphoma (BL),nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and AIDS-associated B-cell lymphomas. EBV is also among a group of viruses that have been associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), although the etiology of CFS still remains unknown.Findings may lead to hypothesize that EBV enzymes, such as the dUTPase, have the capacity to induce immune dysregulation of the T-cell and NK cell responses and that this immune dysregulation produces immunopathology that results in the symptoms that we call CFS.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

18 y/o and above with history of CFS matched those without as to age and gender.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy adults for controls.
  • Adults with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Individuals with significant medical illness in reference to immunosuppressant drug.

Note: We recruit participants in the Mississippi area who could come in our site to provide blood draw.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00433355

Locations
United States, Mississippi
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Jackson, Mississippi, United States, 39216-4505
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Ohio State University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Gailen D Marshall, M.D., PhD University of Mississippi Medical Center
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Gailen D. Marshall, MD, PhD, The University of Mississippi Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00433355     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2006-0265
Study First Received: February 7, 2007
Last Updated: March 18, 2009
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Mississippi Medical Center:
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Epstein-Barr Virus

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Fatigue
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic
Syndrome
Central Nervous System Diseases
Disease
Encephalomyelitis
Muscular Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Neuromuscular Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Signs and Symptoms
Virus Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 20, 2014