Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network Trial - Best Add-On Therapy Giving Effective Response (BADGER)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Vernon M. Chinchilli, PhD, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00395304
First received: October 31, 2006
Last updated: February 24, 2013
Last verified: February 2013
  Purpose

Asthma is a common, serious illness among children in the United States. While a low dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may effectively control symptoms, some children may require additional medications to maintain adequate asthma control. This study compares the effectiveness of a higher dose of ICS, ICS combined with a long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) medication, and ICS combined with a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) medication at reducing the impact and severity of asthma exacerbations that occur in children with mild to moderate persistent asthma.


Condition Intervention Phase
Asthma
Drug: fluticasone propionate + montelukast
Drug: fluticasone propionate
Drug: fluticasone propionate + salmeterol
Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network Trial - Best Add-On Therapy Giving Effective Response (BADGER)

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Milton S. Hershey Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • The Number of Participants With a Differential Response to the Three Step-up Therapies Based on Fixed Threshold Criteria for the Following Three Asthma Control Measures: Use of Oral Prednisone for Acute Asthma Exacerbations, Asthma Control Days and FEV1. [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    One treatment period was ranked as better than another if the total amount of prednisone received during the period was at least 180 mg less, if the number of annualized asthma-control days during the final 12 weeks of the period was increased by at least 31 days, or if the FEV1 at the end of the period was at least 5% higher. If the prednisone threshold was met, then we ignored the number of asthmacontrol days and the FEV1. If the threshold for asthma-control days was met, then we ignored the FEV1. Otherwise, the order of response was determined by the FEV1.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Pre-bronchodilator Forced Expiratory Volume in One Second (FEV1) [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Post-bronchodilator Forced FEV1 [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • FEV1/FVC [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Morning Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Evening PEFR [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • PEFR Variability [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Impulse Oscillometry [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Methacholine PC20 [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Exhaled Nitric Oxide [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Asthma Control Test [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Asthma Quality of Life [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Time Until First Asthma Exacerbation [ Time Frame: Measured during the last 12 weeks of each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Adverse Events [ Time Frame: Measured during each 16-week treatment period ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

Enrollment: 182
Study Start Date: March 2007
Study Completion Date: December 2011
Primary Completion Date: December 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Crossover Sequences

Sequence 1: fluticasone propionate + montelukast, followed by fluticasone propionate, followed by fluticasone propionate + salmeterol

Sequence 2: fluticasone propionate, followed by fluticasone + salmeterol, followed by fluticasone propionate + montelukast

Sequence 3: fluticasone propionate + salmeterol, followed by fluticasone propionate + montelukast, followed by fluticasone propionate

Sequence 4: fluticasone propionate + montelukast, followed by fluticasone propionate + salmeterol, followed by fluticasone propionate

Sequence 5: fluticasone propionate + salmeterol, followed by fluticasone propionate, followed by fluticasone propionate + montelukast

Sequence 6: fluticasone propionate, followed by fluticasone propionate + montelukast, followed by fluticasone propionate + salmeterol

Drug: fluticasone propionate + montelukast
Dry-powder inhaler fluticasone 100 mcg bid (Flovent Diskus®, GlaxoSmithKline) plus Montelukast 5 or 10 mg qd (Singulair®, Merck)
Other Name: Flovent Diskus® + Singulair®
Drug: fluticasone propionate
Dry-powder inhaler fluticasone 250 mcg bid (Flovent Diskus®, GlaxoSmithKline)
Other Name: Flovent Diskus®
Drug: fluticasone propionate + salmeterol
Dry-powder inhaler fluticasone + salmeterol combination 100 mcg/50 mcg bid (Advair Diskus®, GlaxoSmithKline)
Other Name: Advair Diskus®

Detailed Description:

Almost 9 million children in the United States have asthma, and it is a leading cause of hospitalizations and school absenteeism. Common asthma symptoms include wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. While there is no cure for asthma, most children who receive proper treatment are able to control symptoms and lead a normal life. Low doses of ICS are commonly prescribed to prevent symptoms and keep asthma under control. While this is usually sufficient to prevent asthma attacks, some children do not respond well to low dose ICS alone. For these children, their asthma symptoms may be more effectively controlled by either receiving a higher dose of ICS or receiving LABA or LTRA medications in combination with a low dose of ICS. Both LABA and LTRA medications are used to help control moderate to severe asthma. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a high dose of ICS versus a low dose of ICS plus either LABA or LTRA medication at improving asthma control and reducing the severity of symptoms that occur in children with mild to moderate persistent asthma.

This study began with an 8-week screening period during which participants were monitored while they used an inhaler with a low dose of ICS medication. During this time, participants also attended one or two study visits. At each visit, participants underwent a physical examination, exhaled nitric oxide analysis, and lung function and airway pressure testing. After enrollment criteria were met, participants underwent these same evaluations again, and they completed questionnaires to assess asthma control, quality of life, and home environmental factors. Blood was collected and a methacholine challenge test was completed, which artificially triggers an asthma attack to determine the severity of an individual's asthma. Participants then were randomly assigned to one of six treatment sequences, each of which includes the following three regimens in a different order:

  • Low dose of ICS and salmeterol, a LABA medication
  • Low dose of ICS and montelukast, a LTRA medication
  • Double dose of ICS

Each treatment period lasted 16 weeks, with study visits occurring weekly. A physical examination, blood collection, lung function and airway pressure testing, a methacholine challenge test, and questionnaires occurred at selected visits. Throughout the study, participants recorded asthma symptoms, peak expiratory flow rates, and rescue medication usage in a daily diary. The entire length of the study did not exceed 56 weeks.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 18 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Able to perform reproducible spirometry according to American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria
  • History of asthma symptoms (e.g., cough, wheezing, shortness of breath) and meets at least one of the following criteria:

    1. Naïve to controller therapy and meeting National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) criteria for mild-moderate persistent asthma (symptoms at least 2 days per week and/or night-time awakenings due to asthma at least 2 nights per month)
    2. Current uncontrolled asthma (meets NAEPP criteria for mild-moderate persistent asthma) while receiving an ICS dose greater than or equal to 200 ug per day of fluticasone equivalent or some form of non-ICS controller therapy (e.g., montelukast, theophylline, cromolyn)
    3. Asthma is currently under control while receiving an ICS dose between 300 to 400 ug per day of fluticasone equivalent and willing to consider changing current treatment to monotherapy with one dose of ICS (current standard of care)
    4. Asthma is currently under control while receiving some form of combination therapy, such as ICS less than or equal to 200 ug per day of fluticasone equivalent in addition to a non-ICS controller therapy (e.g., LABA, montelukast, theophylline, cromolyn), and willing to consider changing current treatment to monotherapy with one dose of ICS (current standard of care)
  • FEV1 reversibility of at least 12% following bronchodilator administration (4 puffs) at study visit 1. Individuals will need to hold albuterol, montelukast, theophylline, ipratropium bromide (or other anticholinergics) and LABAs per study instructions prior to reversibility testing. If an individual is receiving these types of medications prior to study visit 1, he/she may be brought back to the clinical center within 1 week following appropriate medication withholding to attempt qualification by reversibility criteria. If the individual does not meet this requirement, they may qualify for enrollment if their PC20 methacholine FEV1 is less than or equal to 12.5 mg/ml at the time of randomization. If FEV1 is less than 70%, thus precluding the methacholine challenge at this visit, then completion of the visit will be postponed several days and an additional attempt to obtain a methacholine challenge test will be made. If the methacholine challenge still cannot be performed, an individual may still qualify by reversibility criteria at this visit.
  • History of clinical varicella or varicella vaccine; individuals needing the vaccine may receive it from their primary care physician prior to study entry
  • Ability of parent to provide informed consent; verbal assent must be obtained from children less than 7 years of age and written assent must be obtained from children between 7 and 18 years of age
  • If female, willing to use an effective form of contraception

Prior to being randomly assigned to a treatment group, participants must meet the following criteria to remain in the study:

  • Lack of acceptable asthma control during the 8-week screening period as defined by the following criteria:

    1) On average, on more than 2 days per week, one or all of the following:

    1. Diary-reported symptoms
    2. The use of inhaled bronchodilator (not including pre-exercise)
    3. Peak flows in the yellow zone (less than 80% of post bronchodilator PEF value obtained at study visit 1) OR
  • On average, more than 1 night-time awakening due to asthma, during each 2-week period

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Corticosteroid treatment for any condition prior to study entry within the following defined timepoints:

    1. Oral - Use within 2 weeks of the screening visit
    2. Injectable - Use within 2 weeks of the screening visit
    3. Nasal - May be used at any time during the study at the discretion of the study investigator or primary care physician
  • Current or prior use of medications known to significantly interact with corticosteroid disposition (within a 2-week period of study visit 1), including but not limited to carbamazepine, erythromycin or other macrolide antibiotics, phenobarbital, phenytoin, rifampin, or ketoconazole
  • Pre-bronchodilator FEV1 less than 60% predicted at study visit 1
  • More than three hospitalizations for asthma in the year prior to study entry
  • Presence of chronic or active lung disease other than asthma
  • Significant medical illness other than asthma, including thyroid disease, diabetes mellitus, Cushing's disease, Addison's disease, hepatic disease, or concurrent medical problems that could require oral corticosteroids during the study or would place the participant at increased risk while participating in the study
  • History of cataracts, glaucoma, or any other medical disorder associated with an adverse effect to corticosteroids
  • Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not controlled by standard medical therapy
  • History of significant asthma exacerbation within 2 weeks of study visit 1 or more than 5 courses of systemic corticosteroids in the year prior to study entry
  • History of a life-threatening asthma exacerbation requiring intubation, mechanical ventilation, or resulting in a hypoxic seizure within the 5 years prior to study entry
  • History of adverse reactions to ICS, LTRA, or LABA preparations or any of their ingredients
  • Receiving hyposensitization therapy other than an established maintenance regimen (i.e., continuous regimen for at least 3 months prior to study entry)
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding
  • Inability to perform study procedures
  • Refusal to consent to a genotype evaluation
  • Inability of the child to ingest the study drug
  • Cigarette smoking or smokeless tobacco use in the year prior to study entry
  • Current participation or participation in the month prior to study entry in another investigational drug trial
  • Evidence that the family may be unreliable or nonadherent, or may move from the clinical center area before study completion
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00395304

Locations
United States, Arizona
University of Arizona College of Medicine
Tucson, Arizona, United States, 85724
United States, California
Kaiser Permanente Medical Center
San Diego, California, United States, 92111
United States, Colorado
National Jewish Medical and Research Center
Denver, Colorado, United States, 80206
United States, Missouri
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Missouri, United States, 63110
United States, Wisconsin
University of Wisconsin - Madison
Madison, Wisconsin, United States, 53792
Sponsors and Collaborators
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Investigators
Principal Investigator: David T. Mauger, PhD Penn State College of Medicine
Principal Investigator: Stanley J. Szefler, MD, PhD National Jewish Health
Principal Investigator: Robert F. Lemanske, Jr., MD University of Wisconsin, Madison
Principal Investigator: Robert S. Zeiger, MD, PhD Kaiser Permanente Medical Center
Principal Investigator: Robert C. Strunk, MD Washington University School of Medicine
Principal Investigator: Fernando D. Martinez, MD University of Arizona College of Medicine
Study Chair: Lynn M. Taussig, MD University of Denver
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications:
Responsible Party: Vernon M. Chinchilli, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Public Health Sciences, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00395304     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 444, 5U10HL064313, 5U10HL064288, 5U10HL064305, 5U10HL064295, 5U10HL064287, 5U10HL064307
Study First Received: October 31, 2006
Results First Received: May 17, 2010
Last Updated: February 24, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Asthma
Bronchial Diseases
Hypersensitivity
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Immune System Diseases
Lung Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Respiratory Hypersensitivity
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Fluticasone
Fluticasone, salmeterol drug combination
Montelukast
Salmeterol
Adrenergic Agents
Adrenergic Agonists
Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists
Adrenergic beta-Agonists
Anti-Allergic Agents
Anti-Asthmatic Agents
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Autonomic Agents
Bronchodilator Agents
Dermatologic Agents
Glucocorticoids
Hormone Antagonists
Hormones
Hormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists
Leukotriene Antagonists
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Neurotransmitter Agents

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 23, 2014