Study of Campral (Acamprosate) for Alcohol Dependence in a Family Medicine Clinic

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
James Garbutt, MD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00381043
First received: September 26, 2006
Last updated: February 18, 2013
Last verified: February 2013
  Purpose

This is a study of a medication, acamprosate, which is an FDA approved medication for alcohol problems. We will be examining whether acamprosate compared to a sugar pill (placebo) is more effective for helping with drinking in a Family Medicine clinic.


Condition Intervention Phase
Alcohol Dependence
Drug: Acamprosate (Campral)
Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Campral (Acamprosate) Treatment of Alcohol Dependence in a Family Medicine Setting: A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • % Dropout [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Percentage of participants who dropped out of study by drug condition

  • Percent Days Abstinent [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    %Days without any alcohol consumption over the treatment period


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Retention [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Number of individuals retained in the trial by acamprosate vs placebo group

  • Percent With Complete Abstinence [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    % of subjects with no drinking during the 12 week treatment trial

  • % Heavy Drinking Days During Trial [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    % of Heavy drinking days (5 or more drinks/d for a man or 4 or more drinks/d for a woman) over the 12 weeks of the trial.

  • Clinical Global Impression Scale [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Range of overall severity of illness: 1, normal, not at all ill; 2, borderline ill; 3, mildly ill; 4, moderately ill; 5, markedly ill; 6, severely ill; or 7, extremely ill

  • % Compliant With Medication [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    % of individuals with evidence for 80% compliance with medication based on returned blister packs and weekly diaries.


Enrollment: 100
Study Start Date: August 2006
Study Completion Date: July 2008
Primary Completion Date: July 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: 1- Acamprosate
The study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which participants will receive 333 mg t.i.d. oral acamprosate or matching placebo for a 12-week period. Each participant will also receive brief behavioral intervention at each visit.
Drug: Acamprosate (Campral)
The study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which participants will receive 333 mg t.i.d. oral acamprosate or matching placebo for a 12-week period. Each participant will also receive brief behavioral intervention at each visit.
Other Name: Acamprosate, campral, alcohol dependence medication
Placebo Comparator: 2 - Sugar Pill - Placebo
The study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which participants will receive 333 mg t.i.d. oral acamprosate or matching placebo for a 12-week period. Each participant will also receive brief behavioral intervention at each visit.
Drug: Acamprosate (Campral)
The study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which participants will receive 333 mg t.i.d. oral acamprosate or matching placebo for a 12-week period. Each participant will also receive brief behavioral intervention at each visit.
Other Name: Acamprosate, campral, alcohol dependence medication

Detailed Description:

Acamprosate has been shown to reduce drinking days in alcohol dependent patients and promote abstinence, with few reported side effects. A limitation of these studies, however, has been their lack of generalizability due to restrictive inclusion and exclusion criteria. Furthermore, most of the previous studies of acamprosate have been conducted in Europe, in a different treatment setting from the typical American Family Medicine center, where alcohol dependent patients are most likely to be first identified in the U.S.

The present study is designed to determine the efficacy of acamprosatefor alcohol dependence in a Family Medicine setting using minimal psychotherapeutic interventions—as would also likely occur in a primary care setting. The study will be a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial comparing 666 mg acamprosate t.i.d. to placebo in patients at the UNC Family Medicine Center with alcohol dependence. Subjects will be seen by Family Medicine physicians and receive brief motivational interventions. Primary efficacy will be determined by measuring % days abstinent and secondary outcomes include rates of complete abstinence, % heavy drinking days, CGI and GGT in the acamprosate group compared to the placebo group.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

INCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • 1. Men and women ages 21 to 65 years with a diagnosis of alcohol dependence.
  • 2. History of at least 2 heavy drinking days (men > 5 drinks/day; women > 4 drinks/day) per week, on average, during the month prior to screening.
  • 3. Ability to understand and sign written informed consent.
  • 4. Willingness to refrain from drinking for at least three days prior to randomization.
  • 5. Willingness to consider a goal of abstinence or a significant reduction in drinking as an objective.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • 1. Clinically significant medical disease that might interfere with the evaluation of the study medication or present a safety concern.
  • 2. Clinically significant psychiatric disease, e.g. bipolar disorder, psychosis, that might interfere with study participation or present a safety concern. [Subjects with depression or an anxiety disorder who are receiving medication and are clinically stable for at least one month will not be excluded.]
  • 3. Suicidal ideation or behavior, history of suicide attempt.
  • 4. Renal Impairment; estimated creatinine clearance <50 ml/min.
  • 5. Substance use disorder other than alcohol or nicotine dependence or cannabis abuse.
  • 6. Pregnant or breastfeeding women and women of childbearing potential who do not practice a medically acceptable form of birth control (oral or depot contraceptive, or barrier methods such as diaphragm or condom with spermicidal).
  • 7. Individuals requiring inpatient treatment or more intense outpatient treatment for their alcohol dependence. Individuals may be considered for the trial upon completion of medical detoxification.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00381043

Locations
United States, North Carolina
UNC Family Medicine Center
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States, 27599
United States, Wisconsin
Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States, 53211
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Investigators
Principal Investigator: JC Garbutt, MD University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  More Information

Publications:
Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: James Garbutt, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00381043     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: CMP-MD-06
Study First Received: September 26, 2006
Results First Received: September 13, 2012
Last Updated: February 18, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill:
Alcohol Dependence
Family Medicine Setting
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Alcoholism
Alcohol-Related Disorders
Substance-Related Disorders
Chemically-Induced Disorders
Mental Disorders
Ethanol
Acamprosate
Anti-Infective Agents, Local
Anti-Infective Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Pharmacologic Actions
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Central Nervous System Agents
Alcohol Deterrents

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 25, 2014