Exercise in Insulin-Resistant Minority Adolescents

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00345436
First received: June 27, 2006
Last updated: May 12, 2011
Last verified: May 2011
  Purpose

Insulin resistance, often accompanied by obesity, plays a major role in the development of type 2 diabetes. This phenomenon may be related with the fact that American adolescents are now becoming less physically active in early puberty, explaining the largely pubertal and post-pubertal onset of type 2 diabetes in adolescence. Although regular physical activity has been suggested to attenuate obesity and prevent type 2 diabetes in high-risk children and adolescents, the magnitude of exercise training-induced improvement in the risk factors for type 2 diabetes has been only recently studied in adults and studied very little in pediatric populations. It is clear that exercise, diet, and genetics all contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes in children. However, the few studies that have been done to dissect the relative contributions of these three risk factors have generally used only lipid profiles as the end point. There have been a number of recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of type 2 diabetes, particularly, with regards to insulin regulatory pathways modulated by exercise within muscle tissue.


Condition
Insulin-Resistance

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: An Exercise Intervention in Insulin-Resistant Minority Adolescents

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 40
Study Start Date: February 2006
Estimated Study Completion Date: May 2011
Detailed Description:

Insulin resistance, often accompanied by obesity, plays a major role in the development of type 2 diabetes. This phenomenon may be related with the fact that American adolescents are now becoming less physically active in early puberty, explaining the largely pubertal and post-pubertal onset of type 2 diabetes in adolescence. Although regular physical activity has been suggested to attenuate obesity and prevent type 2 diabetes in high-risk children and adolescents, the magnitude of exercise training-induced improvement in the risk factors for type 2 diabetes has been only recently studied in adults and studied very little in pediatric populations. It is clear that exercise, diet, and genetics all contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes in children. However, the few studies that have been done to dissect the relative contributions of these three risk factors have generally used only lipid profiles as the end point. There have been a number of recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of type 2 diabetes, particularly, with regards to insulin regulatory pathways modulated by exercise within muscle tissue.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years to 18 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

To be included in this study, subjects must meet the following conditions:

Sedentary (regular aerobic exercise less than or equal to 2 times/wk and less than 20 min/session): nonsmoker; impaired glucose tolerance (fasting plasma glucose greater than or equal to 100 mg/dl but less than 126 mg/dl or/and 2 hour plasma glucose greater than or equal to 140 mg/dl but less than 200 MG/dl; BMI-for-age is 95% or greater.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Not pregnant; and not have any other medical condition that would preclude regular exercise.

If taking medication known to affect metabolism.

History of chronic illness known to affect metabolism.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00345436

Locations
United States, District of Columbia
Childrens National Medical Center
Washington, District of Columbia, United States
Sponsors and Collaborators
  More Information

Publications:
Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00345436     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 999906094, 06-CH-N094
Study First Received: June 27, 2006
Last Updated: May 12, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Insulin Sensitivity
Moderate intensity
Insulin Resistance
Exercise Intervention

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Insulin Resistance
Hyperinsulinism
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Insulin
Hypoglycemic Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 27, 2014