The Food Intake Phenotype: Assessing Eating Behavior and Food Preferences as Risk Factors for Obesity

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified January 2014 by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00342732
First received: June 19, 2006
Last updated: March 14, 2014
Last verified: January 2014
  Purpose

The prevalence of obesity in the United States has reached alarming proportions with 33% of adults over the age of 20 being overweight. Obesity is more than twice as prevalent, however, in the Pima Indians of Arizona. Although there have been a number of advances in our understanding of the genetics of obesity, the environmental influences on the genetic expression of obesity requires further investigation.

In an effort to understand some of the influences on the high prevalence of obesity in the Pima Indians, the present study was designed to investigate eating behaviors and food preferences, most especially the preference for high fat foods, in sib-pairs of Pima Indians who have been previously genotyped in our genomic scan for loci linked to diabetes/obesity. Most specifically, we will utilize several questionnaires and methods of assessing eating behavior and the preference for high fat foods to create a food intake phenotype. In addition, we will study Caucasians so that comparisons can be made between these two groups. We will make these evaluations by assessing eating behavior, food preferences including usual fat intake and preferences for high fat foods, body image perceptions, and energy expenditure. It is hoped that the data gathered from this study will elucidate some of the risk factors for the development of obesity among the Pima Indians.


Condition
Obesity

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: The Food Intake Phenotype: Assessing Eating Behavior and Food Preferences as Risk Factors for Obesity

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 600
Study Start Date: April 1999
Detailed Description:

The prevalence of obesity in the United States has reached alarming proportions with 33% of adults over the age of 20 being overweight. In some populations, obesity is even more prevalent. Although there have been a number of advances in our understanding of the genetics of obesity, the environmental influences on the genetic expression of obesity requires further investigation.

In an effort to understand some of the influences on the high prevalence of obesity, the present study was designed to investigate what drives how much people eat. More specifically, we will try to understand what drives food intake utilizing 1) questionnaires that assess eating behavior, 2) measurements in blood, urine or fat tissue, and 3) genotypic associations to investigate the various factors that control what and how much people eat. As food intake influences appetite-regulating hormones and vice versa, we also plan to assess the effect of short-term overfeeding on ad libitum intake and the appetite-stimulating hormone, ghrelin. Also, as the body s metabolism of carbohydrates may influence food intake, we propose to look at the effects of isocaloric high fat and high carbohydrate diets on short-term ad libitum intake. We will make these evaluations by assessing eating behavior, food preferences including usual fat intake and preferences for high fat foods, body image perceptions, and energy expenditure. It is hoped that the data gathered from this study will elucidate some of the risk factors for the development of obesity.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

Healthy, as determined by medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Hypo or hyper thyroid

Blood pressure greater than 160/95

Cardiovascular disease

Gallbladder disease

Alcohol and/or current use of drugs (more than 2 drinks per day and regular use of drugs such as amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, or marijuana)

Psychiatric conditions or behavior that would be incompatible with safe and successful participation in this study, including claustrophobia and eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa

Use of medications affecting metabolism and appetite

Pregnancy

Smoking

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00342732

Contacts
Contact: Susanne Votruba, Ph.D. (602) 200-5336 votrubas@mail.nih.gov

Locations
United States, Arizona
NIDDK, Phoenix Recruiting
Phoenix, Arizona, United States, 85014
Contact: Susanne Votruba, Ph.D.    602-200-5336    votrubas@mail.nih.gov   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Susanne Votruba, Ph.D. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
  More Information

Publications:
Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00342732     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 999999019, OH99-DK-N019
Study First Received: June 19, 2006
Last Updated: March 14, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Genetics
Fat Intake
Pima Indians
Weight Control
Appetite Control

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 01, 2014