A Nested Case-Control Study of Lung Cancer and Diesel Exhaust Among Non-Metal Miners

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00342264
First received: June 19, 2006
Last updated: August 5, 2014
Last verified: August 2013
  Purpose

Diesel exhaust has been classified as a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and as a potential carcinogen by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The carcinogenicity of this pollutant is of concern not only for the one million workers who are exposed occupationally, but also for the general population. Over 30 epidemiologic studies of diesel exhaust exposure have been performed, and the results suggest an increase in lung cancer risk. However, the association is not well defined. Past studies have suffered from the use of crude indicators of exposure, inadequate control of confounding, and/or short follow-up periods, low exposure levels, and small numbers of observations.

NCI and NIOSH are collaborating on two related studies of diesel exhaust under the NCI/NIOSH Interagency Agreement. First, a retrospective cohort mortality study of about 8,200 non-metal miners will be performed to investigate lung cancer mortality in relation to quantitative measures of diesel exhaust exposure, and to determine whether there is evidence of elevated mortality from other causes of death among diesel exhaust exposed miners. The retrospective cohort study will be performed using existing records and information and has been exempted from IRB review. NIOSH is the lead agency on the retrospective cohort study.

The proposed study is a case-control study nested in the retrospective cohort of non-metal miners. The study is expected to include at least 160 members of the cohort who died from lung cancer and four matched controls for each case. Using a structured questionnaire, detailed information will be collected on each subject's lifetime exposure to diesel exhaust, as well as information on smoking and other confounders. This information will allow investigators to examine the association between lung cancer and different quantitative measures of diesel exhaust exposure, adjusted for smoking and other potential confounders.


Condition
Lung Neoplasms

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: A Nested Case-Control Study of Lung Cancer and Diesel Exhaust Among Non-Metal Miners

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Lung cancer [ Time Frame: 6 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 1000
Study Start Date: January 1999
Detailed Description:

Diesel exhaust has been classified as a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and as a potential carcinogen by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The carcinogenicity of this pollutant is of concern not only for the one million workers who are exposed occupationally, but also for the general population. Over 30 epidemiologic studies of diesel exhaust exposure have been performed, and the results suggest an increase in lung cancer risk. However, the association is not well defined. Past studies have suffered from the use of crude indicators of exposure, inadequate control of confounding, and/or short follow-up periods, low exposure levels, and small numbers of observations.

NCI and NIOSH are collaborating on two related studies of diesel exhaust under the NCI/NIOSH Interagency Agreement. First, a retrospective cohort mortality study of about 8,200 non-metal miners will be performed to investigate lung cancer mortality in relation to quantitative measures of diesel exhaust exposure, and to determine whether there is evidence of elevated mortality from other causes of death among diesel exhaust exposed miners. The retrospective cohort study will be performed using existing records and information and has been exempted from IRB review. NIOSH is the lead agency on the retrospective cohort study.

The proposed study is a case-control study nested in the retrospective cohort of non-metal miners. The study is expected to include at least 160 members of the cohort who died from lung cancer and four matched controls for each case. Using a structured questionnaire, detailed information will be collected on each subject's lifetime exposure to diesel exhaust, as well as information on smoking and other confounders. This information will allow investigators to examine the association between lung cancer and different quantitative measures of diesel exhaust exposure, adjusted for smoking and other potential confounders.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 85 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
  • INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Subjects will be identified from all 10 mines participating in the cohort study.

Cases from each mine will be lung cancer deaths as specified on the death certificate occurring among members of the cohort working at the mine between the date the mine was dieselized and December 31, 1996.

Children will be excluded from participating.

We will exclude cases that are found either not likely to be carcinoma of the lung or metastatic to the lung by slide review or pathology report.

Four controls will be selected for each case by random sampling from among all members of the cohort who were alive prior to the day the case died.

Controls will be individually matched to the case on mine, gender, race/ethnicity, and year of birth (within 5 years).

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00342264

Locations
United States, West Virginia
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Morgantown, West Virginia, United States, 26505-2888
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Debra Silverman, D.Sc. National Cancer Institute (NCI)