Trial record 6 of 155 for:    Restless Legs Syndrome

Long-term Study Of Ropinirole In Restless Legs Syndrome

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
GlaxoSmithKline
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00329602
First received: May 23, 2006
Last updated: March 15, 2012
Last verified: March 2011
  Purpose

This is an initial placebo-controlled study followed by open treatment evaluating the effectiveness and tolerability of ropinirole long-term in patients with moderate to severe Restless Legs Syndrome.


Condition Intervention Phase
Restless Legs Syndrome
Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)
Drug: Placebo
Drug: Ropinirole
Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Parallel Group Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Ropinirole for 26 Weeks and to Further Evaluate the Incidence of Augmentation and Rebound for a Further 40 Weeks Open-label Extension Treatment Period in Subjects Suffering From Moderate to Severe Restless Legs Syndrome.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by GlaxoSmithKline:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Mean Change From Baseline in the International Restless Legs Syndrome (IRLS) Rating Scale Total Score at Week 12 and Week 26 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 12 and 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    A 10-item, participant-reported scale covering different symptoms of the condition. Each item is scored from 0 to 4; 0 represents the absence of a problem and 4 reflects a very severe problem. The best and worst possible scores are 0 and 40, respectively; higher scores represent a greater severity of symptoms. A negative change from baseline indicates improvement, and a negative treatment difference indicates a benefit of Ropinirole IR over placebo. The primary assessment was made by calculating the difference in the average score obtained at Baseline with scores at Week 12 and then Week 26.

  • Number of Participants With Clinically Meaningful Augmentation and Early Morning Rebound (EMR) Cases [ Time Frame: During 15-month study duration at scheduled (Weeks 16, 20, 26, or early withdrawal for DB phase; Weeks 39, 47, 55, 63, 67, or early withdrawal for the OL phase) and unscheduled (26-week DB phase and 40-week OL phase) visits ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Clinically meaningful augmentation and early morning rebound (EMR) were assessed and confirmed by an independent Adjudication Board. EMR describes the development of RLS symptoms during the early morning, following therapeutic intervention. EMR is differentiated from augmentation, in which the earlier onset of symptoms occurs in the evening.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Mean Change From Baseline in the International RLS (IRLS) Rating Scale Total Score at Weeks 1, 4, 8, 16, and 20 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 1, 4, 8, 16, and 20 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    A 10-item, participant-reported scale covering different RLS symptoms. Each item is scored from 0 to 4; 0 represents the absence of a problem and 4 reflects a very severe problem. The best and worst possible scores are 0 and 40, respectively; higher scores represent a greater severity of symptoms. The primary assessment from this study was made by calculating the difference in the average score obtained at Baseline with scores at Weeks 1, 4, 8, 16, and 20. Scores were adjusted for baseline IRLS total score, treatment group, visit, visit by treatment group interaction, and center group.

  • Change From Baseline in the Domains of the 12-item Medical Outcomes Study (MOS-12) Sleep Scale at Weeks 12 and 26 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 12 and 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The MOS-12 Sleep Scale is a comprehensive battery, which measures specific aspects of sleep in participants that may have varying co-morbidities, and, as a result, is appropriate for a medically diverse participant population. Domain values are presented on a 0-100 scale, where a higher score means a greater degree of the attribute implied by the scale name. Scores were adjusted for baseline MOS sleep scale domain value, treatment group, visit, visit by treatment interaction, and center group.

  • Change From Baseline in Sleep Quantity, a Domain of the 12-item Medical Outcomes Study (MOS-12) Sleep Scale, at Weeks 12 and 26 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 12 and 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The MOS-12 Sleep Scale is a comprehensive battery, which measures specific aspects of sleep in participants that may have varying co-morbidities, and, as a result, is appropriate for a medically diverse participant population.Scores were adjusted for baseline MOS sleep scale domain value, treatment group, visit, visit by treatment interaction, and center group.

  • Change From Baseline in the Johns Hopkins RLS Quality of Life (RLS QoL) Questionnaire Overall Life Impact Score at Weeks 12 and 26 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 12 and 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The Johns Hopkins RLS QoL Questionnaire is a disease-specific instrument that assesses the impact of RLS on the daily life, emotional well-being, social life, and work life of participants. The overall life impact score for the John Hopkins RLS QoL scale ranges from a lowest possible score of 0 to a highest possible score of 100. Higher scores represent better quality of life. Scores were adjusted for baseline RLS Quality of Life score, treatment group, visit, visit by treatment interaction, and center group.

  • Change From Baseline in the Domains of the MOS 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) at Weeks 12 and 26 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 12 and 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The MOS SF-36 is a generic QoL instrument measuring functional status and well-being. Positive change from baseline for all domains indicates improvement. For all MOS SF-36 domains, the minimum and maximum scores are 0 and 100, respectively, for the transformed scale. Scores were adjusted for baseline domain score, treatment group, visit, visit by treatment interaction, and center group.

  • Percentage of Participants With a Score of Much/Very Much Improved on the Clinical Global Impression-Global Improvement (CGI-I) Scale at Weeks 1, 12 and 26 [ Time Frame: Weeks 1, 12 and 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The CGI-I is a psychometric instrument that is used to measure general clinical status in a variety of disease states. The CGI-I allows the investigator to rate the participant's global improvement or worsening compared with the condition at Baseline (Day 0). The scale is rated from 1-7 (1 = very much improved; 7 = very much worse). Typically, a participant with a score of 1 or 2 (much improved) is considered a responder.

  • Number of Participants Withdrawing Due to Lack of Efficacy During the First 26 Weeks of the Study [ Time Frame: Baseline to Week 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Lack of efficacy is defined as up to a 10% improvement in the IRLS Rating Scale total score from the participant's Baseline value and at least 12 weeks of treatment during the double-blind phase.

  • Number of Participants Rated as Normal or Borderline Ill on the CGI Severity of Illness (CGI-S) Scale at Week 26 [ Time Frame: Week 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The CGI-S scale is a psychometric instrument that is used to measure general clinical status in a variety of disease states. The CGI-S allows the investigator to rate the severity of the participant's illness considering their total clinical experience with the subject population being studied and on all information available at the time of rating. The scale is rated from 1-7 (1 = normal, not at all ill; 2 = borderline ill; 3 = mildly ill; 4 = moderately ill; 5 = markedly ill; 6 = severly ill; 7 = among the most extremely ill participants).

  • Median Time to First CGI-I Response of Much/Very Much Improved During the Double-blind Phase [ Time Frame: Baseline to Week 26 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The median time to first CGI-I response of much/very much improved was calculated. The CGI-I is a psychometric instrument that is used to measure general clinical status in a variety of disease states. The CGI-I allows the investigator to rate the participant's global improvement or worsening compared with the condition at Baseline (Day 0). The scale is rated from 1-7 (1 = very much improved; 7 = very much worse). Typically, a participant with a score of 1 or 2 (much improved) is considered a responder.

  • Number of Participants With a Score of Much/Very Much Improved on the CGI-I Scale at Week 67 [ Time Frame: Week 67 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The CGI-I is a psychometric instrument that is used to measure general clinical status in a variety of disease states. The CGI-I allows the investigator to rate the participant's global improvement or worsening compared with the condition at Baseline (Day 0). The scale is rated from 1-7 (1 = very much improved; 7 = very much worse). Typically, a participant with a score of 1 or 2 (much improved) is considered a responder.

  • Mean Change From Baseline in the IRLS Rating Scale Total Score at Week 67 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Week 67 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    A 10-item, participant-reported scale covering different symptoms of the condition. Each item is scored from 0 to 4, with 0 representing the absence of a problem and 4 reflecting a very severe problem. The best and worst possible scores are 0 and 40, respectively. The primary assessment was made by calculating the difference in the average score obtained at Baseline with score at Week 67.


Enrollment: 404
Study Start Date: March 2006
Study Completion Date: September 2008
Primary Completion Date: September 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Placebo Comparator: Double-blind for 12 to 26 Weeks
Double-blind (Ropinirole:Placebo) for 12 to 26 weeks
Drug: Placebo
Matching Placebo
Drug: Ropinirole
Ropinirole IR 0.25mg/day to 4mg/day for RLS
Open-label ropinirole for 40-Weeks
Open label ropinirole for 40 weeks
Drug: Ropinirole
Ropinirole IR 0.25mg/day to 4mg/day for RLS

Detailed Description:

A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ropinirole for 26 weeks and to further evaluate the incidence of augmentation and rebound for a further 40 weeks open-label extension treatment period in subjects suffering from moderate to severe Restless Legs Syndrome.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 79 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Male and female subjects, between the ages of 18 and 79, inclusive

A female is eligible to enter and participate in the study if she is of:

  1. Non-childbearing potential (i.e., physiologically incapable of becoming pregnant, including any female who is post-menopausal); or,
  2. Childbearing potential, has a negative result on all required pregnancy tests prior to randomisation, and agrees to an acceptable contraceptive method.

    • Subjects with a diagnosis of idiopathic RLS using the RLS Diagnostic Clinical Interview and the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) Diagnostic Criteria during the Screening Visit.
    • Subjects have had RLS symptoms with a history of a minimum of 15 RLS episodes during the previous month. If this is not possible due to the subject being on previous medication to treat RLS the investigator should ensure that the subject should have experienced 4-5 episodes of RLS symptoms during the last 7 days of the wash-out phase (see below). The subject must discontinue and wash-out any previous medication for the treatment of RLS or sleep prior to the Baseline Visit (Day 0). The minimum discontinuation period for wash-out is generally 5 half-lives of the medication or 7 consecutive evenings/nights medication-free prior to baseline, whichever is the longer period.
    • During the Wash-out and Screening Phase, RLS symptoms must be present for at least 4 of the last 7 nights immediately prior to the Baseline Visit (e.g., any combination of evenings and /or nights for = 4 days).
    • Subjects with a total score = 24 on the IRLS Rating Scale at baseline (Day 0).
    • Subjects with RLS symptoms that cause significant sleep impairment based on clinical judgment and guided by subject response to Question 4 of the IRLS Rating Scale (e.g., ordinarily this will include a response of (3) severe or (4) very severe sleep disturbance) at the Baseline Visit OR RLS symptoms that cause severe/very severe discomfort in the limbs based on clinical judgment and guided by subject response to Question 1 of the IRLS Rating Scale (e.g., this will include a response of (3) severe or (4) very severe discomfort in limbs) at the Baseline Visit (Day 0).
    • Subjects must be experiencing RLS symptoms requiring treatment at night-time.
    • Subjects must have given written informed consent prior to any specific study procedures.

Exclusion criteria:

  • Subjects suffering from augmentation and/ or 'end of treatment' rebound RLS symptoms at baseline (Day 0). Augmentation is defined as RLS symptoms that occurred while on treatment and occur earlier in the afternoon/evening than they did before, symptoms which are more severe than when not treated, symptoms which start after less time at rest than they did before treatment, or symptoms which involve other parts of the body, such as the arms or trunk. 'End of treatment' rebound describes worsening of symptoms from baseline that occur after pharmacological treatment is stopped.
  • Subjects with a previous history of augmentation.
  • Subjects who have exhibited intolerance to ropinirole or any other dopamine agonist.
  • Subjects requiring treatment of daytime RLS symptoms (daytime defined as 10:00 hours until 17:00 hours).
  • Signs of secondary RLS (e.g., end stage renal disease, iron deficient anaemia or pregnancy at Baseline Visit).
  • Subjects with a serum ferritin level of < 10 mcg/L (ng/mL) at Screening Visit.
  • Subjects who suffer from a primary sleep disorder other than RLS that may significantly affect the symptoms of RLS (e.g. narcolepsy, sleep terror disorder, sleepwalking disorder, breathing related sleep disorder).
  • Subjects diagnosed with movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's Disease, dyskinesias, and dystonias).
  • Subjects who have medical conditions which could affect efficacy assessments or clinically significant or unstable medical conditions that present a safety concern. These may include, but are not limited to, the following disorders: diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia syndrome, symptomatic orthostatic hypotension, severe cardiovascular disease, hepatic or renal failure, pleuro-pulmonary fibrosis, major psychotic illness.
  • Subjects having a clinically significant abnormal laboratory value, ECG, or physical examination findings not resolved by the time of the baseline examinations (Day 0). Abnormal 12-lead ECG findings include, but are not limited to, the following: myocardial ischemia, clinically significant conduction abnormalities, or clinically significant arrhythmias.
  • Subjects with a diastolic blood pressure = 110mmHg or = 50mmHg or systolic blood pressure = 180mmHg or = 90mmHg at the Screening or Baseline Visit.
  • Subjects with a history of alcohol or substance abuse within the past year.
  • Subjects taking any medication known to induce drowsiness, affect RLS or sleep and which have not been discontinued prior to the Baseline Visit. These medications include the following:

Atypical and typical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, opioids (including propoxyphene and oxycodone), anxiolytics, all sedatives/hypnotics (including benzodiazepines), lithium, oral neuroleptics, stimulants (including methylphenidate), dopamine agonists (including ropinirole), dopamine antagonists (e.g., typical neuroleptics, metoclopramide), levodopa/carbidopa, clonidine, and sedating antihistamines (e.g., chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine) or any preparations containing these antihistamines.

The minimum discontinuation period is generally 5 half lives or 7 consecutive evenings/nights medication free, prior to baseline, whichever is the longer period. Exceptions to this general rule are: fluoxetine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors: 4 weeks.

For subjects entering the 40-week, open-label treatment phase, the GSK Medical Monitor can be contacted to discuss individual cases where adherence to the above may not have occurred.

  • Withdrawal, introduction, or change in dose of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and/or any drug known to substantially inhibit CYP1A2 (e.g., ciprofloxacin, cimetidine, fluvoxamine, HRT) or induce CYP1A2 (e.g., tobacco, omeprazole) within 7 days prior to enrolment. Subjects already on these agents may be enrolled, but must remain on stable doses of the agents from 7 days prior to enrolment through to the follow-up visit at the end of the study.
  • Night workers or any others whose sleeping habits are incompatible with the study design, or who would be required to make significant changes to their bedtime during the course of the study.
  • Participation in any clinical drug or device trial in the one month prior to the Baseline Visit.
  • Subjects who, in the opinion of the investigator, would be non-compliant with the visit schedules or other study procedures.
  • Women who have a positive pregnancy test or who are lactating.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00329602

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Sponsors and Collaborators
GlaxoSmithKline
Investigators
Study Director: GSK Clinical Trials GlaxoSmithKline
  More Information

No publications provided by GlaxoSmithKline

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: GlaxoSmithKline
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00329602     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: ROR104836
Study First Received: May 23, 2006
Results First Received: September 10, 2009
Last Updated: March 15, 2012
Health Authority: Germany: Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices

Keywords provided by GlaxoSmithKline:
Severe
Moderate
Restless Legs Syndrome
ropinirole

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Restless Legs Syndrome
Psychomotor Agitation
Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic
Dyssomnias
Sleep Disorders
Nervous System Diseases
Parasomnias
Mental Disorders
Dyskinesias
Neurologic Manifestations
Psychomotor Disorders
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Signs and Symptoms
Ropinirole
Antiparkinson Agents
Anti-Dyskinesia Agents
Central Nervous System Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Pharmacologic Actions
Dopamine Agonists
Dopamine Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Physiological Effects of Drugs

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 15, 2014