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Substance Use Risk Education (SURE) Project

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
Syracuse University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00289965
First received: February 8, 2006
Last updated: July 25, 2011
Last verified: July 2011
  Purpose

This project is designed to compare college drinking interventions on outcomes and cost-effectiveness. We plan to recruit 700 students with residence hall alcohol violations to participate in a randomized study to evaluate 3 brief interventions: in-person brief motivational intervention, Alcohol 101plus (an interactive CD-ROM program), and AlcoholEdu (a Web-based tutorial). Participants will be followed over 12 months to determine changes in alcohol consumption and related problems. We will also explore which participants might respond better to one intervention vs the others.


Condition Intervention Phase
Alcohol Abuse
Alcohol Drinking
Behavioral: Counselor-administered Brief Motivational Intervention (BMI)
Behavioral: Alcohol 101 Plus (interactive CD-ROM)
Behavioral: AlcoholEdu (Internet-based tutorial)
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: Brief Alcohol Interventions by Counselor vs Computer

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Syracuse University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • mean number of drinks per week [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • drinks per drinking day [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • frequency of heavy drinking episodes [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC) [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rutgers Alcohol Problems Index (RAPI) score [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • readiness to change [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • decisional balance [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • client satisfaction [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • norms perception [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 703
Study Start Date: September 2005
Study Completion Date: June 2009
Primary Completion Date: June 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: 1
in-person brief motivational intervention
Behavioral: Counselor-administered Brief Motivational Intervention (BMI)
Students participate in a randomized study to evaluate 3 brief interventions: in-person brief motivational intervention, Alcohol 101plus (an interactive CD-ROM program), and AlcoholEdu (a Web-based tutorial). Participants will be followed over 12 months to determine changes in alcohol consumption and related problems.
Active Comparator: 2
Alcohol 101plus
Behavioral: Alcohol 101 Plus (interactive CD-ROM)
Students participate in a randomized study to evaluate 3 brief interventions: in-person brief motivational intervention, Alcohol 101plus (an interactive CD-ROM program), and AlcoholEdu (a Web-based tutorial). Participants will be followed over 12 months to determine changes in alcohol consumption and related problems.
Active Comparator: 3
AlcoholEdu (a Web-based tutorial).
Behavioral: AlcoholEdu (Internet-based tutorial)
Students participate in a randomized study to evaluate 3 brief interventions: in-person brief motivational intervention, Alcohol 101plus (an interactive CD-ROM program), and AlcoholEdu (a Web-based tutorial). Participants will be followed over 12 months to determine changes in alcohol consumption and related problems.

Detailed Description:

Many college students engage in heavy episodic drinking, a pattern that increases risks of undesired academic, social, health, and legal consequences. Fortunately, brief motivational interventions - when administered during face-to-face sessions by a trained counselor - can help students to reduce their heavy drinking and related consequences. However, use of such counselor-administered interventions on college campuses remains infrequent; instead, administrators rely on computerized brief interventions because they can be administered with fewer staff at lower cost. Two computer-administered interventions (AlcoholEdu and Alcohol 101 Plus) are used by more than 1,000 colleges and universities nationwide, even though these interventions have not been evaluated in controlled studies. Despite the magnitude of the college-drinking problem, no data have addressed the differential efficacy (or cost-effectiveness) of the computer-administered versus counselor-administered brief motivational interventions. Thus, the primary purpose of the proposed research is to address gaps in the scientific literature by evaluating outcomes of three types of brief motivational interventions: a theoretically-based and empirically-tested counselor-administered intervention and the two most popular computerized interventions. A secondary purpose of the proposed research is to identify predictors of outcomes, and moderators associated with differential intervention response. A tertiary purpose is to assess the cost-effectiveness of three types of brief motivational interventions. The proposed research will be a randomized controlled trial with four treatment conditions and four assessment occasions. We will recruit at-risk student drinkers who have been sanctioned to receive an alcohol education intervention because they violated a residence hall policy. These referred students will be randomized to one of the three interventions, or to a delayed intervention control; and assessed at baseline and again 1, 6, and 12 months later on key drinking and drinking consequences outcomes.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 25 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Freshman, sophomore, and junior college students
  • Students sanctioned for an alcohol-related violation on campus

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Year in college: senior
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00289965

Locations
United States, New York
Syracuse University
Syracuse, New York, United States, 13244
Sponsors and Collaborators
Syracuse University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Kate B. Carey, PhD Syracuse University
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: Kate B. Carey, PhD, Syracuse University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00289965     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: NIAAACAR012518-06, R01AA012518, NIH Grant 2R01AA012518-06
Study First Received: February 8, 2006
Last Updated: July 25, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by Syracuse University:
Alcohol Abuse
Alcohol Drinking
Intervention Studies
Computer-Assisted Instruction
College Students

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking Behavior
Ethanol
Anti-Infective Agents
Anti-Infective Agents, Local
Central Nervous System Agents
Central Nervous System Depressants
Pharmacologic Actions
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Therapeutic Uses

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 24, 2014