Psychosocial Treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Adults

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified November 2008 by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00278473
First received: January 13, 2006
Last updated: December 30, 2008
Last verified: November 2008
  Purpose

This study will determine the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy as compared to a problem-solving social support group in treating problems of time management, organization, and planning in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).


Condition Intervention
Attention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity
Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Group Treatment
Behavioral: Social Support Problem-Solving Group Treatment

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Treatment of Meta-Cognitive Deficits in Adults With ADHD

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH):

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Time management, organization and planning skills [ Time Frame: Measured at Weeks 6 and 12 and Months 3 and 6 post-treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • ADHD symptoms [ Time Frame: Measured at Weeks 6 and 12 and Months 3 and 6 post-treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Depression symptoms [ Time Frame: Measured at Weeks 6 and 12 and Months 3 and 6 post-treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Anxiety [ Time Frame: Measured at Weeks 6 and 12 and Months 3 and 6 post-treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Self-esteem [ Time Frame: Measured at Weeks 6 and 12 and Months 3 and 6 post-treatment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 84
Study Start Date: May 2005
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2008
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1.
Cognitive behavioral group
Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Group Treatment
Cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on changing patterns of thinking and behavior. Each group consists of 6 to 8 members and sessions are led by a psychologist.
Active Comparator: 2.
Social support problem-solving group
Behavioral: Social Support Problem-Solving Group Treatment
Social support problem-solving focuses on general support, problem solving, and information sharing. Each group consists of 6 to 8 members and sessions are led by a psychologist.

Detailed Description:

ADHD is a chronic neurobiological condition that affects people of all ages, genders, and races. Symptoms of ADHD may include, but are not limited to, the following: poor attention span; physical restlessness or hyperactivity; excessive impulsivity; chronic procrastination; frequently losing things; poor organization, planning, and time management skills; and excessive forgetfulness. Not every person with ADHD exhibits all of these symptoms, and the severity of the disorder can range from mild to severe. While there is no cure for ADHD, the condition can be managed with an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment. Left untreated, individuals with ADHD may experience significant impairment in social, emotional, occupational, and academic functioning. Stimulant and non-stimulant medications are usually effective in alleviating symptoms of ADHD in adults. However, some research suggests that medications may not effectively treat self-management functioning problems and that as many as one-third of adults with ADHD have inadequate responses to medication treatment. Additional research on the benefits of psychosocial treatments for ADHD in adults is needed. This study will determine the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy as compared to a problem-solving social support group in treating problems of time management, organization, and planning in adults with ADHD.

Individuals interested in participating in this study will first undergo an assessment of their eligibility for inclusion in the study. The assessment will last approximately 6 hours, but can be broken up into as many as 4 separate visits. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to either receive group cognitive-behavioral therapy or join a problem-solving social support group. Both groups will meet once a week for 12 weeks. Each session will last roughly 2 hours and will focus on building time management, organizational, and planning skills. Time management, planning, and organizational skill levels will be assessed at the treatment mid-point, immediately following the intervention, and at 3 and 6 months following the treatment. Self-esteem and symptoms of depression and anxiety will also be measured at these visits.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Suspected of having or have been diagnosed with ADHD
  • May potentially benefit from the ADHD group treatment

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Any overt cognitive disability (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, mental retardation)
  • Deemed not to potentially benefit from the proposed ADHD group treatment
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00278473

Locations
United States, New York
The Mount Sinai Medical Center
New York, New York, United States, 10029
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Mary V. Solanto, PhD The Mount Sinai Medical Center
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Mary Solanto, PhD, Principal Investigator, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00278473     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R34 MH71721, DATR A2-AIR
Study First Received: January 13, 2006
Last Updated: December 30, 2008
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH):
Primarily Inattentive
Hyperactive Impulsive Type
Combined Type
ADHD
Adults
Psychological
CBT

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Hyperkinesis
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood
Mental Disorders
Dyskinesias
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014