Does Spiritual/Religious Commitment Mediate the Relationship Between Mood Variability and Suicidal Ideation.

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Saskatoon Health Region
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Marilyn Baetz, University of Saskatchewan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00225459
First received: September 21, 2005
Last updated: October 4, 2011
Last verified: October 2011
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not spiritual and/or religious commitment affects mood variability and thoughts of suicide.

First we hypothesize that among patients with depressive symptoms, those who have higher religious/spiritual (R/S) commitment will have less suicidal ideation and less mood variability. Second, we hypothesize that higher mood variability will be associated with more suicidal ideation. Finally, dependent on the first two hypotheses, we propose that R/S commitment will mediate the relationship between mood variability and suicidal ideation.


Condition
Anxiety Disorder
Mood Disorder

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case-Crossover
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Does Spiritual/Religious Commitment Mediate the Relationship Between Mood Variability and Suicidal Ideation.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Saskatchewan:

Estimated Enrollment: 200
Study Start Date: June 2005
Study Completion Date: December 2008
Detailed Description:

The suicide rate has not changed dramatically in the recent past, despite advances in psychiatric and mental health treatment, suicide prevention and awareness programs, and reorganization of health services. Depression and the mood disorders which may affect 15% of the population are the conditions most associated with high suicide rates (in addition to psychotic conditions that are relatively rare). Research findings into specific conditions within the depressive disorders that might predict suicidal tendencies are sparse, except for other common comorbid conditions such as panic and alcohol abuse. Research into risks and protective factors has infrequently included religious and spiritual variables that have been associated with decreased rates of depression, suicide, suicide attempts and suicidal ideation.

An inverse relationship between religion and suicide has been found in regional, national, and cross-national studies. Analyzing data from the 1993 Mortality Followback Survey in the US, frequency of religious activities reduced the odds of dying by suicide even after controlling for the frequency of social contact; in 584 deaths by suicide compared with 4279 natural deaths. A Canadian study of 261 Census divisions found the absence of religious affiliation to be an important predictor of death by suicide.

There are no known studies examining mood variability and religion, or spirituality directly. A number of studies however have examined personality attributes and religiosity. The personality style of neuroticism includes moodiness and negative emotionality with the concept of mood reactivity being germane to its construct. Neuroticism is highly correlated with depression and may be a higher order factor in the "internalizing disorders" which include the depressive and anxiety disorders.

The objective of this study is to answer the question "Does R/S mediate the relationship between mood variability and suicidal ideation?" In an effort to achieve that objective, there are three questions that must be answered in this population which in themselves are significant contributions to the research literature.

  1. Is there an association between mood variability and suicidal ideation?
  2. Is there an association between mood variability and religion?
  3. Is there an association between religion and suicidal ideation?

We hypothesize that those who endorses higher religious/spiritual commitment as measured by daily spiritual experiences, positive religious coping, and personal devotion, will have less suicidal ideation, and less mood variability. Secondly, we hypothesize that higher mood variability will be associated with more suicidal ideation. Finally, dependent on the first two hypotheses, we propose that R/S commitment will mediate the relationship between mood variability and suicidal ideation.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 70 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

The study population is psychiatric inpatients and outpatients with depressive symptoms between the ages or 18 and 70. Co-morbid anxiety, bipolar spectrum, and eating disorders will be allowed. Involuntary patients and those with psychosis, organic brain impairment, and current substance dependence will be excluded. We will recruit patients prospectively, as they attend psychiatrists' clinics and are admitted to hospital.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Inpatients and outpatients.
  • DSM-IV defined major depression.
  • Comorbid anxiety, bipolar spectrum, and schizoaffective (depressive type).
  • Males and females between the ages of 18 and 70.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Involuntary patients.
  • In/out patients with current psychosis.
  • In/out patients with neurological impairment.
  • In/out patients with current substance dependence.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00225459

Locations
Canada, Saskatchewan
University of Saskatchewan Department of Psychiatry
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, S7N 0W8
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon Health Region
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Marilyn Baetz, MD University of Saskatchewan
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Marilyn Baetz, Professor of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00225459     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Beh-REB 05-18
Study First Received: September 21, 2005
Last Updated: October 4, 2011
Health Authority: Canada: Ethics Review Committee

Keywords provided by University of Saskatchewan:
Religious psychology
Anxiety disorder
Mood disorder
Suicide

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Anxiety Disorders
Suicidal Ideation
Mood Disorders
Mental Disorders
Suicide
Self-Injurious Behavior
Behavioral Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 28, 2014