Etiologies and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Failure in Community

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified July 2005 by National Taiwan University Hospital.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Taiwan University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00174070
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: November 2, 2005
Last verified: July 2005
  Purpose

Acute respiratory failure (ARF) remains a common reason for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). ARF to be present in 32% of patients on ICU admission, with a further 24% of patients developing ARF during the ICU stay. A total of 56% of all ICU admissions for a length of >48 h had ARF at some point during their stay. The incidence of ARF was from 88.6 to 137.1 hospitalizations per 100,000 residents. The incidence of ARF was found to increase nearly exponentially with each decade until age 85 years. However, there is still paucity data about etiology and outcomes of acute respiratory failure happened in community.

Mortality of ARF in critically ill patients is between 40% and 65%. Independent hazards for ARF mortality include older age, severe chronic co-morbidities (HIV, active malignancy, cirrhosis), certain precipitating events (trauma, drug overdose, bone marrow transplant), and multiple organ system failure (MOSF) [7-9]. Mortality has also been associated with acute lung injury or bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph, and with an elevated acute physiology score.

ARF patients form a large percentage of all ICU admissions and many factors might influence the final outcomes. With the high incidence of ARF in ICU, any improvement in the outcome of such population is likely to have marked effect on intensive care resource allocation. We wish this study may provide some valuable information about acute respiratory failure in community and improve the outcome of these patients.


Condition
Respiratory Failure

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Defined Population
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Etiologies and Outcomes Analysis of Acute Respiratory Failure in Community

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Taiwan University Hospital:

Estimated Enrollment: 150
Study Start Date: August 2005
Estimated Study Completion Date: February 2006
Detailed Description:

Acute respiratory failure (ARF) remains a common reason for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). ARF to be present in 32% of patients on ICU admission, with a further 24% of patients developing ARF during the ICU stay [1]. A total of 56% of all ICU admissions for a length of >48 h had ARF at some point during their stay [1]. The incidence of ARF was from 88.6 to 137.1 hospitalizations per 100,000 residents [2, 3]. The incidence of ARF was found to increase nearly exponentially with each decade until age 85 years. However, there is still paucity data about etiology and outcomes of acute respiratory failure happened in community.

Mortality of ARF in critically ill patients is between 40% and 65% [2, 4-6]. Independent hazards for ARF mortality include older age, severe chronic co-morbidities (HIV, active malignancy, cirrhosis), certain precipitating events (trauma, drug overdose, bone marrow transplant), and multiple organ system failure (MOSF) [7-9]. Mortality has also been associated with acute lung injury or bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph [6], and with an elevated acute physiology score [9-10].

ARF patients form a large percentage of all ICU admissions and many factors might influence the final outcomes. With the high incidence of ARF in ICU, any improvement in the outcome of such population is likely to have marked effect on intensive care resource allocation. We wish this study may provide some valuable information about acute respiratory failure in community and improve the outcome of these patients.

References:

  1. Vincent JL, Akca S, De Mendonca A, et al: The epidemiology of acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients. Chest 2002; 121:1602-1609
  2. Lewandowski K, Mets J, Deutschmann H, et al. Incidence, severity, and mortality of acute respiratory failure in Berlin, Germany. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1995; 151:1121-1125
  3. Behrendt CE. Acute respiratory failure in the United States: incidence and 31-day survival. Chest 2000; 118:1100-1105
  4. Miberg JA, Davis DR, Steinberg KP, et al. Improved survival of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): 1983-1993. JAMA 1995; 273:306-309
  5. Doyle LA, Szaflarski N, Modin GW, et al. Identification of patients with acute lung injury: predictors of mortality. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1995; 152:1818-1824
  6. Luhr OR, Antonsen K, Karlsson M, et al. Incidence and mortality after acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome in Sweden, Denmark, and Iceland: The ARF Study Group. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1999; 159:1849-1861
  7. Vasilyev S, Schaap RN, Mortensen JD. Hospital survival rates of patients with acute respiratory failure in modern respiratory intensive care units. Chest 1995; 107:1083-1088
  8. Stauffer JL, Fayter NA, Graves B, et al. Survival following mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure in adult men. Chest 1993; 104:1222-1229
  9. Knaus WA. Prognosis with mechanical ventilation: the influence of disease, severity of disease, age, and chronic health status on survival from an acute illness. Am Rev Respir Dis 1989; 140:S8-S13
  10. Epstein SK, Vuong V. Lack of influence of gender on outcomes of mechanically ventilated medical ICU patients. Chest 1999; 116:732-739
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Acute respiratory failure with mechanical ventilation
  • Respiratory failure happened within 48 hours after admission
  • Age > 18 y/o

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnanacy
  • Transfer from other hospital with mechanical ventilation
  • Mechanical ventilation after scheduled operation
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00174070

Contacts
Contact: Chia-Lin Hsu, MD 886-2-23123456-2905 cls7@ha.mc.ntu.edu,tw

Locations
Taiwan
National Taiwan University Hospital Recruiting
Taipei, Taiwan
Contact: Chial-Lin Hsu, MD    886-2-23123456-2905    cls7@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw   
Contact: Jih-Shuin Jerng, MD    886-2-23123456-2905    jsjerng@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw   
Principal Investigator: Chia-Lin Hsu, MD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Taiwan University Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Chia-Lin Hsu, MD Physcian
  More Information

Publications:

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00174070     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 9461700726
Study First Received: September 13, 2005
Last Updated: November 2, 2005
Health Authority: Taiwan: Department of Health

Keywords provided by National Taiwan University Hospital:
Respiratory failure
Community

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult
Respiratory Insufficiency
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Respiration Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 18, 2014