Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Steve Marshall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00124319
First received: July 25, 2005
Last updated: October 3, 2011
Last verified: May 2009
  Purpose

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located inside the knee joint and provides stability to the knee. ACL injuries occur more frequently in women than men; the reason for this is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine gender-specific anatomical, hormonal, and demographic risk factors for ACL injury. This observational cohort study will only enroll incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies.

Study hypothesis: Human movement factors, including key kinetics and kinematics of the knee during a jump-landing task, are associated with the rate of ACL injury.


Condition
Knee Injuries
Athletic Injuries

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Epidemiology of Jump-Landing Movements and ACL Injury

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill:

Estimated Enrollment: 4800
Study Start Date: June 2005
Study Completion Date: March 2011
Primary Completion Date: March 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
1
Incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies

Detailed Description:

The ACL stabilizes the knee joint by preventing the shinbone (tibia) from sliding forward beneath the thighbone (femur). A hard twist or excessive pressure on the ACL can tear or rupture the ligament, resulting in high levels of short-term disability and extensive rehabilitation. Previous data indicate that women who participate in sports or who are otherwise physically active have higher rates of ACL injury than men; the reason for this is unknown. There are four groups of potential risk factors for ACL injury: environmental, anatomical, hormonal, and biomechanical or neuromuscular. In particular, poor technique when landing from a jump (also known as jump-landing) is proposed as a specific neuromuscular risk factor of interest in this study. This study will determine gender-specific anatomical, hormonal, and demographic risk factors for ACL injury, as well as quantify gender-specific differences in jump-landing technique and other neuromuscular risk factors.

This observational cohort study will enroll 4,800 cadets at the three large U.S. military academies; approximately 50% of those enrolled will be women. Only incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies will be able to participate. Each study participant will undergo a baseline assessment that will include measurement of neuromuscular risk factors using motion analysis, strength testing, and standardized assessment of poor jump-landing technique using the Landing Error Score System (LESS). All participants will be followed for up to 4 years. ACL injuries will be prospectively identified; an injury questionnaire is administered to participants who sustain an ACL injury while they are cadets. Otherwise, there is no further contact.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Incoming cadet at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00124319

Locations
United States, Colorado
U.S. Air Force Academy
Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States, 80840
United States, Maryland
U.S. Naval Academy
Annapolis, Maryland, United States, 21402-5000
United States, New York
U.S. Military Academy
West Point, New York, United States, 10996
Sponsors and Collaborators
Steve Marshall
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Stephen W. Marshall, PhD University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Steve Marshall, Professor of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00124319     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R01 AR050461, R01AR050461, R01-AR050461-01-A1
Study First Received: July 25, 2005
Last Updated: October 3, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill:
Biomechanics
Neuromuscular
Lower limb
Injury
ACL
Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Athletic Injuries
Knee Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Leg Injuries

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 23, 2014