Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Steve Marshall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00124319
First received: July 25, 2005
Last updated: October 3, 2011
Last verified: May 2009
  Purpose

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located inside the knee joint and provides stability to the knee. ACL injuries occur more frequently in women than men; the reason for this is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine gender-specific anatomical, hormonal, and demographic risk factors for ACL injury. This observational cohort study will only enroll incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies.

Study hypothesis: Human movement factors, including key kinetics and kinematics of the knee during a jump-landing task, are associated with the rate of ACL injury.


Condition
Knee Injuries
Athletic Injuries

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Epidemiology of Jump-Landing Movements and ACL Injury

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill:

Estimated Enrollment: 4800
Study Start Date: June 2005
Study Completion Date: March 2011
Primary Completion Date: March 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
1
Incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies

Detailed Description:

The ACL stabilizes the knee joint by preventing the shinbone (tibia) from sliding forward beneath the thighbone (femur). A hard twist or excessive pressure on the ACL can tear or rupture the ligament, resulting in high levels of short-term disability and extensive rehabilitation. Previous data indicate that women who participate in sports or who are otherwise physically active have higher rates of ACL injury than men; the reason for this is unknown. There are four groups of potential risk factors for ACL injury: environmental, anatomical, hormonal, and biomechanical or neuromuscular. In particular, poor technique when landing from a jump (also known as jump-landing) is proposed as a specific neuromuscular risk factor of interest in this study. This study will determine gender-specific anatomical, hormonal, and demographic risk factors for ACL injury, as well as quantify gender-specific differences in jump-landing technique and other neuromuscular risk factors.

This observational cohort study will enroll 4,800 cadets at the three large U.S. military academies; approximately 50% of those enrolled will be women. Only incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies will be able to participate. Each study participant will undergo a baseline assessment that will include measurement of neuromuscular risk factors using motion analysis, strength testing, and standardized assessment of poor jump-landing technique using the Landing Error Score System (LESS). All participants will be followed for up to 4 years. ACL injuries will be prospectively identified; an injury questionnaire is administered to participants who sustain an ACL injury while they are cadets. Otherwise, there is no further contact.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Incoming cadets at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Incoming cadet at the U.S. Naval, Air Force, or Military Academies
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00124319

Locations
United States, Colorado
U.S. Air Force Academy
Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States, 80840
United States, Maryland
U.S. Naval Academy
Annapolis, Maryland, United States, 21402-5000
United States, New York
U.S. Military Academy
West Point, New York, United States, 10996
Sponsors and Collaborators
Steve Marshall
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Stephen W. Marshall, PhD University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Steve Marshall, Professor of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00124319     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R01 AR050461, R01AR050461, R01-AR050461-01-A1
Study First Received: July 25, 2005
Last Updated: October 3, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill:
Biomechanics
Neuromuscular
Lower limb
Injury
ACL
Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Athletic Injuries
Knee Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Leg Injuries

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014