Major Depression and Inflammatory Risk Markers for Coronary Heart Disease

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
American Heart Association
Information provided by:
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00037505
First received: May 17, 2002
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: December 2003
  Purpose

The overall purpose of this research is to examine whether depression influences immune system function. Studies indicate that individuals who are depressed experience coronary heart disease at a higher rate than expected. This study's goal is to begin identifying mechanisms that might be responsible for this process. This research also examines whether behavioral processes (e.g. smoking) or hormonal processes (e.g. adrenaline release) are responsible for immune system differences between depressed and nondepressed people


Condition
Depression

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Defined Population
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Major Depression and Inflammatory Risk Markers for Coronary Heart Disease

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Center for Research Resources (NCRR):

Detailed Description:

To qualify for participation, subjects are to be between the ages of 18-55, medically healthy and free of all medication three months prior to enrollment. Half of them will be clinically depressed; the remaining one half will be healthy controls without a history of psychiatric illness. All subjects who qualify for the study will attend two laboratory sessions. During the first visit, participants will undergo a structured psychological interview, complete questionnaires about their mood, personality, and behavior, and have blood drawn to assess their immune system function. During the second visit, participants will complete additional questionnaires about their mood, personality, and behavior. The subjects will also participate in a mock job interview to look at their body's response to stress. Before and after the interview, the subjects will have blood drawn and be asked to collect saliva samples to assess their immune system function. In addition to the two laboratory visits, participants will be asked to collect additional information while going about their normal activities. In order to accomplish this, they will be given a small hand held portable computer. Four times each day for four days, the computer will signal them to collect a saliva sample. This will be used later to measure hormone levels. This study will explore changes in the immune system and metabolic system that might predispose depressed individuals to develop heart disease

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   15 Years to 55 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

For eligibility, potential subjects will be 18-55 years of age, free of all medication during the past three months, and have no history of chronic illness involving the cardiovascular, endocrine, immune systems

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00037505

Locations
United States, Missouri
Washington University
St. Louis, Missouri, United States, 63130
Sponsors and Collaborators
American Heart Association
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00037505     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: NCRR-M01RR00036-0849
Study First Received: May 17, 2002
Last Updated: June 23, 2005
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Coronary Artery Disease
Myocardial Ischemia
Coronary Disease
Depression
Depressive Disorder
Heart Diseases
Depressive Disorder, Major
Cardiovascular Diseases
Arteriosclerosis
Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Behavioral Symptoms
Mood Disorders
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 18, 2014