Predictors of Driving Performance and Successful Mobility - Rehabilitation in Patients With Medical Eye Condition

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Department of Veterans Affairs
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00013377
First received: March 14, 2001
Last updated: January 20, 2009
Last verified: January 2001
  Purpose

There are two diseases in particular that may have serious consequences for driving and mobility due to their potentially severe impact on visual function: glaucoma and diabetic neuropathy. In this project we will develop predictive models of driving for these patients and will train them to use low-vision aids to improve driving mobility. We will determine how best to train patients with hemianopic field loss due to cerebral vascular accidents and identify predictors of long-term success in the use of low-vision aids.


Condition Intervention Phase
Low Vision
Procedure: Low vision
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: Predictors of Driving Performance and Successful Mobility - Rehabilitation in Patients With Medical Eye Condition

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Department of Veterans Affairs:

Estimated Enrollment: 30
Study Start Date: April 1999
Study Completion Date: March 2002
Detailed Description:

There are two diseases in particular that may have serious consequences for driving and mobility due to their potentially severe impact on visual function: glaucoma and diabetic neuropathy. Both these diseases can potentially result in significant peripheral visual field loss, sometimes coupled with decreased visual acuity. We have previously demonstrated that each of these visual losses alone can have significant impact on driving and mobility performance. In this project we will develop predictive models of driving for these patients and apply our extensive expertise in training patients to use low-vision aids to improve driving mobility. A second question that will be addressed is how to best train scanning patients with hemianopic field loss due to cerebral vascular accidents. We propose to configure the prisms in a bioptic form similar to previously used for amorphic lenses in RP and for bioptic telescopes for patients in macular disease. The third problem that will be addressed is the identification of predictors of long-term success in the use of low-vision aids.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Eye impairment

  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00013377

Locations
United States, Illinois
VAMC (West Side)
Chicago, Illinois, United States
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Investigator: John Fryer, Ph. D., Asst. Director Program Analysis and Review Section (PARS), Rehabilitation Research & Development Service
Investigator: Nancy Rocheleau, Program Analyst Program Analysis and Review Section (PARS), Rehabilitation Research & Development Service
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00013377     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: C1982R
Study First Received: March 14, 2001
Last Updated: January 20, 2009
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by Department of Veterans Affairs:
Low vision, Driving rehabilitation

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Vision, Low
Eye Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Sensation Disorders
Signs and Symptoms
Vision Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 23, 2014