Genetics of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005657
First received: May 6, 2000
Last updated: April 20, 2011
Last verified: April 2011
  Purpose

The diverse clinical syndromes associated with hepatitis C underscore the multifactorial and polygenic nature of HCV infection. Both viral and host factors likely contribute to variations in infection outcome, disease susceptibility and progression, and treatment response. This protocol will focus on the immunogenetics of HCV infection. Various candidate genes, most of them related to host immune response in microbial infection, have defined genetic polymorphisms that have been associated with variable manifestations of infections including malaria, tuberculosis, leprosy, AIDS and hepatitis B. In this proposal, we plan to collect peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a source of DNA from approximately 1500 patients with HCV infection, analyze genetic polymorphisms of various candidate genes in association with viral clearance, disease progression or treatment response, and characterize the functional consequences of these polymorphisms in patients with well-defined clinical sequelae of HCV infection. We will also collect blood from patients with other forms of liver diseases (approximately 300) or normal volunteers (approximately 200) as controls. By identifying relevant host factors genetically and investigating their molecular interactions with HCV, we may gain additional insights into HCV pathogenesis and uncover new potential targets for vaccine development and treatment intervention.


Condition
Hepatitis C
Liver Disease

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: Immunogenetics of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Enrollment: 870
Study Start Date: May 2000
Estimated Study Completion Date: April 2011
Detailed Description:

The diverse clinical syndromes associated with hepatitis C underscore the multifactorial and polygenic nature of HCV infection. Both viral and host factors likely contribute to variations in infection outcome, disease susceptibility and progression, and treatment response. This protocol will focus on the immunogenetics of HCV infection. Various candidate genes, most of them related to host immune response in microbial infection, have defined genetic polymorphisms that have been associated with variable manifestations of infections including malaria, tuberculosis, leprosy, AIDS and hepatitis B. In this proposal, we plan to collect peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a source of DNA from approximately 1500 patients with HCV infection, analyze genetic polymorphisms of various candidate genes in association with viral clearance, disease progression or treatment response, and characterize the functional consequences of these polymorphisms in patients with well-defined clinical sequelae of HCV infection. We will also collect blood from patients with other forms of liver diseases (approximately 300) or normal volunteers (approximately 200) as controls. By identifying relevant host factors genetically and investigating their molecular interactions with HCV, we may gain additional insights into HCV pathogenesis and uncover new potential targets for vaccine development and treatment intervention.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   2 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

Patients who have recovered from past HCV exposure (positive anti-HCV but negative HCV viremia and absent liver disease).

Patients with asymptomatic HCV infection (positive anti-HCV and HCV viremia, but persistently normal or minimally elevated ALT and normal or mild disease on liver biopsy).

Patients with active liver disease (positive anti-HCV and HCV viremia, persistently elevated ALT and/or moderate disease on liver biopsy).

Patients with active extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection (cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, vasculitis, etc.).

Patients with rapidly progressive, severe liver disease and/or hepatocellular carcinoma.

Patients who have undergone or are undergoing treatment.

Patients from a single-source outbreak of HCV infections (in which the viral factors should be identical and the patients are often from a homogeneous population with less genetic variability).

HCV infected family members and twins.

Patients with other forms of liver disease including HBV infection, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hemochromatosis, and Wilson's Disease, as well as normal volunteers.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Adult subjects with a Hct of less than 30 or pediatric subjects less than 25 will be excluded.

Children with HCV infection younger than 2 years of age will be excluded.

Unaffected healthy volunteers who are minors are not eligible for this study.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00005657

Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005657     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 000125, 00-DK-0125
Study First Received: May 6, 2000
Last Updated: April 20, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Cytokines
Treatment
Genetic Polymorphism
Chronic Hepatitis C
Mononuclear Cells

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hepatitis
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis C
Liver Diseases
Virus Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Hepatitis, Viral, Human
Enterovirus Infections
Picornaviridae Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Flaviviridae Infections

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 26, 2014