Effects of Strength Training on Knee Osteoarthritis

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Indiana University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00000406
First received: November 3, 1999
Last updated: April 29, 2013
Last verified: April 2013
  Purpose

To understand the effects of leg strengthening exercise, we will study the effects of strength training of the legs in four groups of people: (1) osteoarthritis (OA) with knee pain; (2) OA without knee pain; (3) no OA but elderly with knee pain; and (4) normal elderly with no OA or knee pain. In each of the first three groups, we will look at whether people who do strength training have less pain and/or slower progression of x-ray signs of OA over 30 months than people who perform nonstrengthening, range-of-motion exercises. We are including the fourth group to find out whether people with OA (groups 1 & 2) have the same response to strength training as healthy elderly people, and whether those with knee pain (groups 1 & 3) have the same response to training as those without joint pain.


Condition Intervention Phase
Osteoarthritis, Knee
Procedure: Progressive resistance exercise
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Single Blind
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effects of Strength Training on Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Indiana University:

Estimated Enrollment: 280
Study Start Date: September 1977
Study Completion Date: November 2006
Primary Completion Date: November 2006 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

Several studies have confirmed that weak leg muscles are associated with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Studies of body composition in these people have also shown that, despite being weaker, people with OA have significantly greater muscle mass than those without OA, suggesting that those with OA may have the potential to greatly increase their strength. However, research has not clearly shown whether exercises designed to improve leg strength will decrease the severity of pain or slow the progression of OA based on radiographic (x-ray) analysis. To understand the effects of leg strengthening exercise, we will perform a randomized clinical trial of lower extremity strength training using four subgroups of people: (1) OA with knee pain; (2) OA without knee pain; (3) no OA with knee pain; and (4) normal elderly with no OA or knee pain.

In each of the first three groups, we will determine whether people assigned to strength training have lower pain scores and/or slower progression of radiographic changes of OA over 30 months than controls who perform nonstrengthening exercises (i.e., range-of-motion exercises). We are including the fourth group to determine whether those with OA (groups 1 & 2) exhibit the same response to strength training as healthy elderly people, and whether those with knee pain (groups 1 & 3) have the same response to training as those without joint pain. We will also prospectively monitor changes in body composition and bone mass, quality of life, and symptoms of depression.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   60 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Males and females 60 to 100 years of age

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Knee joint replacement surgery
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Uncontrollable hypertension
  • Neuropathies of the lower extremity
  • Poor mental cognition (i.e., inability to follow instructions)
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00000406

Locations
United States, Indiana
National Institute for Fitness and Sport
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, 46202
Sponsors and Collaborators
Indiana University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Alan Mikesky, PhD Indiana University School of Medicine
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Indiana University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000406     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: P60 AR20582 Substudy EEHSR3, P60AR020582, NIAMS-022
Study First Received: November 3, 1999
Last Updated: April 29, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by Indiana University:
Osteoarthritis (OA)
Knee
Radiographic OA
Strength training
Physical therapy
Exercise
Body composition
Striated muscle
Depression
Radiographic OA with knee pain
Radiographic OA without knee pain
Knee pain without radiographic OA
Normal elderly (no radiographic OA, no knee pain)

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis, Knee
Arthritis
Joint Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Rheumatic Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 18, 2014